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Defining charge induction.

  1. May 3, 2009 #1
    "Induction is a process of increment of charge such that the charge induced equals to the charge difference between the source charge and the body (which need to be charged) if the body is having an opposite and initial charge lower that that of the charging source."

    This is what I concluded...am I right?...If I am, I got some major problems.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 4, 2009 #2
    No one can confirm this?...well I find it true...following this for a real-life lossy capacitor, I get problems.
     
  4. May 7, 2009 #3
    Ok, what are the previous generalisations do we have about charge induction?
     
  5. May 7, 2009 #4
    Hi there,

    Since you seem to really want to have an answer on this one.

    Charge induction is a very simple process which consist bringing a charged body near a grounded conductor. The charged body will, by the Coulomb force, "force" opposite charges to be accumulated in the conductor. Once this is done, the grounding can be cut off, resulting in a conductor having an amount of electrical charges distributed on its surface.

    Cheers
     
  6. May 8, 2009 #5
    Of course, I know that, but I made a generalisation and I wanna see if its true.

    I'm talking about the intensity of induction here under ideal conditions (i.e no E.F losses).
     
  7. May 8, 2009 #6
    Of course, I know that, but I made a generalisation and I wanna see if its true.

    I'm talking about the intensity of induction here under ideal conditions (i.e no E.F losses).
     
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