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Homework Help: Definite integral

  1. Sep 25, 2010 #1
    This is not really a homework.

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    I am trying to solve one definite integral

    2. Relevant equations

    [tex] \int_0^{2 \pi} \frac{\sin^2{t}}{\sqrt{a\cos{t} + b}} dt[/tex]

    where [tex]a, b[/tex] are some positive numbers.

    3. The attempt at a solution

    I tried integrate by parts, also differentiate by parameter [tex]a[/tex]. Does not help because of the square root. In this case I got some diff.equation for the integral I want, but I need to solve even more nasty integrals:

    either

    [tex] \int_0^{2 \pi} \sqrt{a\cos{t} + b} \cos{t} dt[/tex]

    or

    [tex] \int_0^{2 \pi} \frac{1}{\sqrt{a\cos{t} + b}} dt[/tex]
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 25, 2010 #2

    cronxeh

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    You joking, right? Even by breaking this up into two separate integrals, the first one 1/sqrt(a*cos(t)+b), t=0..2pi and second one -cos^2(t)/sqrt(a*cos(t)+b), t=0..2pi.. This gives some complete elliptic integral of first one for first part, and series expansion for second part. At best you can get a complete series expansion of this with http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=Expand+(1-cos^2(t))/sqrt(a*cos(t)+b)" and numerically evaluate it if you know a and b.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2017
  4. Sep 25, 2010 #3
    Thank you for your reply. As I said this is not a homework problem. In fact if somebody could help me represent this intergral via some generalized functions this would do. Sorry for the misconception.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2017
  5. Sep 25, 2010 #4

    cronxeh

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    Gold Member

    I can't see how this could be done. a and b make this impossible
     
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