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Degrees Description

  1. May 28, 2008 #1
    Hello. May I get a description of the common degrees offered by academic institutions (bachelors, masters, professional, PhD) and what kind of work/duties/options would each of these open/close for an individual?

    I'm interested after I heard a comment about "PhD holders rarely considered for non-research positions."



    Jordan Joab.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 28, 2008 #2

    Choppy

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    Hi Jordan,

    You'll probably have to narrow your question down a little if you want a specific response. These days you can get a degree in just about anything - but it academics only hinders you if you allow it.
     
  4. May 28, 2008 #3

    Defennder

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    You can try this: http://www.bls.gov/search/ooh.asp?ct=OOH

    Although it doesn't list out generally available academic degrees and then tell you what you can do with it, it lists just about all the job descriptions in the US, as well as academic qualifications required to get the job.
     
  5. May 28, 2008 #4
    Well, I'm more interested in finding out whether it's true or not that PhDs are rarely considered for non-research positions and if true, what's the reasoning?



    Jordan.
     
  6. May 29, 2008 #5

    robphy

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  7. May 29, 2008 #6
    I can't talk about physics, but in the computer industry, Ph.Ds are hired for non-research positions all the time.

    To the degree that they aren't considered for non-research positions in physics, I would guess that the reason is purely monetary. Ph.Ds cost more than non-Ph.Ds, so if a non-Ph.D could do the job, why hire a Ph.D.?
     
  8. May 29, 2008 #7

    Choppy

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    The danger of having a Ph.D. is that it can over-qualify you for many positions. If you're looking for a position outside of academia or industrial research, then employers are likely to feel that you'll move on from their position as soon as something better comes along.

    Generally though, it's all about how you sell yourself. You can't expect the Ph.D. to get a job for you - regardless of field.

    On the other hand, getting a Ph.D. is really tough. You have to live on minimal funds and work extremely long hours in a competative and challenging environment. You really have to have a passion for your field to get through without burning out. There's not much point in putting yourself though all that if you have no interest in pursuing research.
     
  9. May 30, 2008 #8
    Alright. What would be the main difference(s) between a PhD and a Professional degree? What doors do each one open or close? What can and can't you do with each? Details please. Thanks.



    Jordan Joab.
     
  10. May 30, 2008 #9

    Defennder

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    You're asking a very general question. Why don't you narrow it down to specific fields of study so the posters here can answer them?
     
  11. May 30, 2008 #10
  12. May 30, 2008 #11
    Ah well, it doesn't matter anyways. This whole "going to college" thing has me stressed out and more confused than ever. I'll probably end up with some lousy career anyways. Thanks for the replies and my apologies for wasting your time.



    Jordan Joab.
     
  13. May 30, 2008 #12
    Well with that mindset I'm sure you are correct
    (no offense intended)
    but really, cheer up mate.
     
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