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Dehumidifier compressor

  1. Nov 5, 2015 #1
    I'm working on a project to design Atmospheric Water Generator, to generate 3 litres of water per day. and I'm using the same concept as dehumidifier.
    My problem is I want to figure out how powerful my compressor should be. I need to calculate that, given a heat flow rate of 352.91 kJ/hour. Anyone can lead me to the right direction.

    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 6, 2015 #2
    There is a lot of things to learn first
    • Specific Heat Capacity of Air
    • RH%
    • mass rate, etc.
    • Psychometric Chart
    • Compressors
    • Motors
    • Air conditioning
    • Thermodynamics
    Given that you ask the forum on this, I assume you have no background and enough knowledge to tackle this problem.
    Safety first, though common sense dictates. It is important that you and the life and risk of other people and damages on property are well anticipated from trials and experiments unmitigated by the appropriate knowledge and practice.

    One thing, I could advice on you: get a proper degree in mechanical engineering and get a license after or simply consult a professional and let him do this job for you.
     
  4. Nov 6, 2015 #3

    russ_watters

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    Staff: Mentor

    The other option is to search for the ratings of existing products.
     
  5. Nov 6, 2015 #4
    Thanks for the reply, I'm doing a mechanical engineering degree, and this is a project I'm working on. I'm not concerned in assembling different parts together and coming up with result, but justifying why each component and calculating design numbers of each component. My problem is with the compressor. How do you calculate the power output, of a semi hermetically sealed compressor
     
  6. Nov 6, 2015 #5
    What year are you in the degree of ME? 3337_fig-2-5-2.jpg Did your professor not taught you this?
     
  7. Nov 6, 2015 #6
    3rd year, I studied it, in my first year thermodynamics. Don't remember much about it now
     
  8. Nov 6, 2015 #7

    russ_watters

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    Staff: Mentor

    Agreed. If you've already taken your first thermodynamics course, you should be able to diagram out the cycle and calculate every aspect of the performance.
     
  9. Nov 6, 2015 #8

    russ_watters

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    That's a really serious problem. How can you expect to have a 30 year engineering career if you can't remember/apply what you learned two years ago?

    You need to dig out your thermodynamics book from two years ago (I keep mine at my desk) and re-learn and start applying the stuff. We can help you along the way, but we can't do this project for you!
     
  10. Nov 6, 2015 #9
    I'm not asking you to do my project for me. Just asking for a point to the right direction.
     
  11. Nov 6, 2015 #10
    You better not remember it, but internalized everything you can. Mechanical Engineering is the most practical and easy to appreciate field among the engineering discipline, because it deals with macroscopic dynamic of things.

    It is time for you to learn something new or review the past topics by research first and then query.
    This is included in your Thermodynamics II.

    I am afraid, that's the only point I can help you by now, answering in a forum is quite a hassle - I think you need a lecture not a Q&A session

    See or search :
    • Reverse Carnot Cycle (Ideal) or Refrigeration/Vapor Cycle
     
  12. Nov 6, 2015 #11

    russ_watters

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    Ronnie's post #5 provides an excellent starting point. Take a shot at it.
     
  13. Nov 6, 2015 #12
    Yeah I will, and thanks a lot to both of you.
     
  14. Nov 6, 2015 #13
    No problem, salmansl. You could see youtube, there's alot of tutorials/refresher posted on this topics by now. Nowadays, learning is an easy thing, just a matter of initiative.
    I see you have initiative and perseverance, I'm pretty sure you could get it done.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2015
  15. Nov 6, 2015 #14

    russ_watters

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    You're welcome. We'll certainly be able to provide more specific help as you get into it. An additional hint though: I'm not sure where you got the 353 kJ/hr, but in real world engineering, establishing the design conditions/constraints is a significant part of the design process.
     
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