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Delta Heat of Formation

  1. Nov 13, 2007 #1
    Currently I am enrolled in college level General Chemistry course, and at this time we are working on a project to figure out the delta heat for formation of a specific reaction.

    The equation is this

    H2 + CuSO4(aq) ---> Cu(s) + H2SO4.

    We have gone through and determined the half reactions for finding the Delta heat for formation. But we are not allowed to create H2SO4 directly because we don't posses the materials for the environment. We know how to create CuSO4 but we do not know how to react the Cu and S04.

    Is there an alternate solution to figuring out the delta heat of formation for CuSO4 and H2SO4? Those are the only two heats of formation we need to get in order to solve for the delta heat of formation for the entire reaction. Possibly different reactions to find the delta heats of formation?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 14, 2007 #2
    Sorry, it's difficult for me to understand exactly what data you can use and what you can't.

    Furthermore, what means "We have gone through and determined the half reactions for finding the Delta heat for formation" and "We know how to create CuSO4 but we do not know how to react the Cu and S04"?

    Sorry, it's probably my difficulty in understanding your terminology.
     
  4. Nov 17, 2007 #3
    if i'm not wrong, this reaction ain't supposed to be occuring. H2 will not react with Cu2+.

    you can't determine enthalpy change of formation in this reaction. the enthalpy change of formation is when 1 mol of a compound is produced from its elements in their elemental states.

    e.g. enthalpy change of CO2:

    C + O2 -----> CO2

    the energy change in this reaction gives the enthalpy change of formation of CO2.


    maybe you're referring to simply the enthalpy change of this reaction, which isn't supposed to occur??!!

    Then you may use Hess' Law. Or you could measure initial and final temperature before and after reaction and calculate the heat energy liberated. But i doubt it will work. I'm just saying this to tell you the methods to calculate energy changes.
     
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