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Derive the equation

  1. Oct 4, 2013 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    Derive the equation v^2 = u^2 + 2as

    I have no clue how to do this please can someone help!

    Thank you!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 4, 2013 #2
    Notice that there is no t involved in this relationship. Look at your equations for distance and average acceleration and see how to eliminate t.
     
  4. Oct 4, 2013 #3

    gneill

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    Staff: Mentor

    I don't know about you, but whenever I see velocity-squared terms I tend to think about kinetic energy... :wink:
     
  5. Oct 4, 2013 #4
    gneill, I am sure you are correct but you can also derive this equation from two basic equations and energy principals are not required.
     
  6. Oct 4, 2013 #5

    gneill

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    Sure. But it's nice to have options. Some approaches are more intuitively obvious to different people.
     
  7. Oct 4, 2013 #6
    If you use energy, then you have to introduce mass and this is not necessary.
     
  8. Oct 4, 2013 #7

    gneill

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    Mass disappears by cancellation. No biggie. Or use specific energy :smile:
     
  9. Oct 4, 2013 #8
    So why complicate a simple problem?
     
  10. Oct 4, 2013 #9

    gneill

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    It's no more complicated an approach if you're familiar with the concept. Like I said, different strokes for different folks.

    Let's wait to see what the OP comes up with.
     
  11. Oct 4, 2013 #10
    Derive via using other kinematic equations?
     
  12. Oct 4, 2013 #11
    Note that this equation is assuming that acceleration, the derivative of velocity with respect to time, is constant. This is, then, just a simple exercise in calculus.
     
  13. Oct 4, 2013 #12
    Hi Marksmeets. Welcome to Physics Forums. We can best answer your question if we know whether you have had calculus yet. Have you?
     
  14. Oct 4, 2013 #13
    I'm thinking if its an intro class then there's no calculus and just want you to use other kinematic equations to this one. I remember having a question where it was just that for intro physics but I can't be certain about op.
     
  15. Oct 4, 2013 #14
    This is definitely an intro physics question. Only algebra 1 is needed, that is if you have the two kinematic equations.
     
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