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Deriving a statement's scientificness from its claim structure

  1. Dec 12, 2006 #1
    TITLE: Deriving a statement's scientificness from its claim structure
    OBJECTIVE: To make a clear demarcation on what is a falsifiable or unfalsifiable claim.

    Types of claims (in increasing order of objectivity).
    • FEELING: When the only elements of an "explanation" are states in attempt to explain a state, such an explanation is not subjectable to scientific or otherwise academic scrutiny, whether the statement is true or false.
      • Examples:
      • "I feel sick" because "it's wet outside".
      • "That person is cool" because "they look cool in those jeans".
      • "It's hot" because "it's very nice".
    • OPINION: When the only elements of an "explanation" are event(s) in attempt to explain a state, such an explanation is subjectable to academic scrutiny, but not scientific scrutiny, whether the statement is true or false.
      • Examples:
      • "I feel sick" because "I inhaled too much rain".
      • "That person is cool" because "they've said nice things to me".
      • "It's hot" because "our team won the game".
    • JUSTIFYING: When the only elements of an "explanation" are states in attempt to explain an event, such an explanation is subjectable to academic and scientific scrutiny whether the statement is true or false. But either the explanations begs question about the state itself, or it is tautological fact. Such statements are not falsifiable given the limited context.
      • Examples:
      • "My temperature is rising" because "I have a cold".
      • "They've said nice things" because "they are nice people".
      • "That person helped us win the game" because "her strategy was excellent".
    • REVEALING: When the only elements of an "explanation" are event(s) in attempt to explain an event, such an explanation is subjectable to academic and scientific scrutiny whether the statement is true or false. It is possible for this form not to beg the question, in light of explanations of the causal events, and the only tautologies that are allowed in this form are explicit, rather than implicit.
      • Examples:
      • "My temperature is rising" because "I have caught flames on my sweater".
      • "They've said nice things" because "they learn from other people who have said nice things to them".
      • "That person helped us win the game" because "she scored the only points we needed to win".
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2006
  2. jcsd
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