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Design vs Maths/physics

  1. Jul 1, 2006 #1
    Hi, I'd like to know if any engineers out there use what they've been taught at university or is it the fundamentals that are important? I neither hate nor love physics/maths but I love design....how does that work out if i was to chose a path in engineering?
     
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  3. Jul 1, 2006 #2

    brewnog

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    I probably used 10% of my degree when working in design. That's not to say the rest wasn't needed. You need to be able to understand the fundamentals to be aware of what effects you might be dealing with. Besides, in this day and age you won't get an engineering design job straight out of school without having a good engineering degree. Treat maths and physics as tools you can use to realise your designs, and you won't go far wrong.
     
  4. Jul 1, 2006 #3

    FredGarvin

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    In my experience, the higher end learning is needed to refine and optimize designs. To get a rough design concept usually doesn't need too much in the way of analysis. That is what most classes in engineering are. Analysis of a given system/thing.

    One thing I will also say is that there is a lot of extra learning involved with design that is not taught in colleges.
     
  5. Jul 1, 2006 #4

    Integral

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    Lots of engineers do not apply the math and Physics they should have learned in college to their designs....
    It is obvious when it comes to either make them work or trying to keep them working. It takes a lot of experience and talent to know how to apply the fundamentals in creating a design. There are a LOT more design engineers then there are GOOD design engineers.

    Much of what is learned in an undergrad degree only applies APPROXIMATELY to the real world, the trick is to learn what the approximations mean and how to fudge them to get to the real world.
     
  6. Jul 2, 2006 #5

    Ivan Seeking

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    One thing that never ceases to amaze me is how seemingly simple processes or designs can be terribly complex to implement. It seems that entire concepts require little more than the back of a napkin, whereas a proper design for the same may keep you busy for years or even decades. In the end it all comes down to good physics and engineering; and lots of it.

    Also, you learn the fundamentals while attending the university. Without the education you will probably never get past napkins.
     
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