Desmos Question

  • #1
CallMeDirac
46
10
Often in desmos when you graph a line it shows the X and Y-intercept with a grey dot.
However when I graph something like sin(50)=5/x it doesn't show
which I find odd because sin(x) does show the intercepts

It only gets more complicated when graphing tangent and cosine. Both DO show the X-intercept. Further Cotangent and Secosine also do show the intercept.

why
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
lomidrevo
434
249
I don't know desmos, but what do you expect when plotting "something like sin(50)=5/x "?
Hint1: sin(x) is a function, your other expression is an equation
Hint2: sin(50) is a constant, 5 is a constant, so what is the solution of your equation?
 
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  • #3
CallMeDirac
46
10
I was wrong

Turns out its not the function (sine tan etc.)
it's where the x is

if the x is the numerator ( sin(60)=x/30) it will show the dot
but if it is the denominator (sin(60)=30/x) it wont

still why
 
  • #4
CallMeDirac
46
10
I don't know desmos, but what do you expect when plotting "something like sin(50)=5/x "?
Hint1: sin(x) is a function, your other expression is an equation
Hint2: sin(50) is a constant, 5 is a constant, so what is the solution of your equation?

I was just talking about intercepts
it only shows the x-intercept when the x is in the numerator (see previous post)

edit: desmos will show the x-intercept for equations (65+x=180 will show an intercept at 115)
 
  • #5
lomidrevo
434
249
It shows, you just need to zoom out the graph. If you solved your equations, you would see that solution for ##x## are located out of the range of the default zoom (in my browser it is from -10 to 10).

As I told you in my previous post, plotting a function (like ##y=f(x)##) and solving a linear equation with one unknown are not the same operation. It is a feature of this tool, that it gives you the solution graphically. That is a vertical line for constant ##x##. However, I am not sure what is skeptical about my post according to you. Both provided hints would lead you to discover answer to your question.
 
  • #6
CallMeDirac
46
10
It shows, you just need to zoom out the graph. If you solved your equations, you would see that solution for ##x## are located out of the range of the default zoom (in my browser it is from -10 to 10).

That's irrelevant
 
  • #7
CallMeDirac
46
10
As I told you in my previous post, plotting a function (like ##y=f(x)##) and solving a linear equation with one unknown are not the same operation. It is a feature of this tool, that it gives you the solution graphically. That is a vertical line for constant ##x##.

that would make sense if the x intercept was also not present in the equation with the numerator.

However, I am not sure what is skeptical about my post according to you. Both provided hints would lead you to discover answer to your question.

You didn't, that's why I used a skeptical reaction. I explained in a previous post that it plots similar equations, furthermore the question was about a grey point showing the x-intercept not the lack of a representative line.
 

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