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Desperate Student Seeking Help

  1. Jan 20, 2006 #1
    I'm a Junior, in my 3rd year of Algebra :grumpy:

    I will probably just try a tutor, but... maybe somebody on here could help me for the time being. Here is an example of a test we take.

    (6, -3) (-4, 1)

    Point Slope
    Slope Intercept
    Intercepts ( , ) ( , )

    Could somebody please either tell me how to do those, or link me to a site that will? Thank you!
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 20, 2006 #2


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    Have you checked your textbook? Surely it has an example where they solve a problem just like this one?
  4. Jan 20, 2006 #3


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    All you need to do is write an equation for the line through these two points; the rest of the answers fall directly out of that equation.

    - Warren
  5. Jan 20, 2006 #4
    I did look in the back. They didn't give examples in the form of "(#,#) (#,#)" but written as an actual equation. How would I write my example out as an equation? or two? I am so confused. And greatly appreciative of help, thank you!
  6. Jan 21, 2006 #5


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    If that is the exact wording of the problem on a test, you should complain to whoever wrote the test. First, you don't "solve" two points. I guess the problem is to find equations of the line through those two points in "point, slope" form, "slope, intercept" form, and "standard form", and then find the intercepts. All of those are easy if you know what the words mean! I recommend you go to the back of your book again, but this time to the index! Look up each of those. If some or all are not in the index, look through the chapter that introduces straight line graphs.

    Oh, and since this problem has nothing to do with "Linear and Abstract Algebra" (yes, I know the word "algebra" is in there but this is a whole different thing!) I am moving it to Precalculus Homework where you might get more help.
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2006
  7. Jan 22, 2006 #6
    Well think of it first. Your textbook should at least very basically tell you what the formulas you should use for your homework.

    In general, it always follows the equation [tex]y = mx + b[/tex]. From here, you can derive all your basic information for a graph. If you want standard form, use [tex]y_2 - y_1 = m (x_2 - x_1)[/tex].

    Good luck!
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