Determine the activation energy for the reverse reaction

In summary, when given the activation energy for the forward reaction and the delta h for the reaction, the activation energy for the reverse reaction can be determined by subtracting the delta h from the activation energy for the forward reaction. It is important to properly understand and draw the potential energy diagram in order to fully grasp this concept.
  • #1
RPN
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Hey ,
I still do not understand how to determine the activation energy for the reverse reaction when you are given the activation energy for the forward reaction and the delta h for the reaction. I was told to draw an energy diagram but I think I am drawing it wrong. I do know that the activation energy for the reverse reaction is larger than the forward reaction. Could someone explain how to get the activation energy and how to properly draw a potential energy diagram.
Thanks
 
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  • #2
In general [tex]activation~energy_{forward}~-\Delta H~=~activation~energy_{reverse} [/tex]

I think that your text will be better for understanding the potential energy diagram, it is quite essential that you understand the diagram.
 
  • #3


Hello, determining the activation energy for the reverse reaction can be a bit tricky, but I'll try to explain it in a simple way. First, let's start with the basics. Activation energy is the minimum amount of energy required for a chemical reaction to occur. In a potential energy diagram, it is represented as the difference between the energy of the reactants and the highest energy point on the curve, also known as the transition state.

Now, to determine the activation energy for the reverse reaction, we need to consider the fact that the reverse reaction is essentially the forward reaction happening in the opposite direction. This means that the energy of the products in the reverse reaction will be the same as the energy of the reactants in the forward reaction, and vice versa.

So, to get the activation energy for the reverse reaction, we need to subtract the activation energy of the forward reaction from the delta H (enthalpy change) of the reaction. This is because delta H is the overall change in energy between the reactants and products, and the activation energy is just a part of that overall energy change.

In terms of drawing a potential energy diagram, the reverse reaction will have the same curve as the forward reaction, but flipped horizontally. This means that the activation energy for the reverse reaction will be represented as the difference between the energy of the products and the lowest energy point on the curve.

I hope this helps clarify things for you. If you're still unsure, I suggest seeking further guidance from your teacher or a tutor. Best of luck!
 

Related to Determine the activation energy for the reverse reaction

1. What is activation energy for a reverse reaction?

The activation energy for a reverse reaction is the amount of energy required for a reaction to proceed in the reverse direction.

2. How is activation energy determined for a reverse reaction?

Activation energy for a reverse reaction can be determined experimentally by measuring the rate of the reverse reaction at different temperatures and using the Arrhenius equation to calculate the activation energy.

3. Is activation energy the same for both forward and reverse reactions?

No, the activation energy for a reverse reaction is typically different from the activation energy for the forward reaction. This is because different bonds are broken and formed in each direction, resulting in different energy requirements.

4. What factors can affect the activation energy for a reverse reaction?

The activation energy for a reverse reaction can be affected by factors such as temperature, reactant concentrations, and catalysts. A higher temperature or a higher concentration of reactants can decrease the activation energy, while a catalyst can lower it even further.

5. Why is knowing the activation energy for a reverse reaction important?

Knowing the activation energy for a reverse reaction is important because it provides insight into the energy barrier that must be overcome for the reaction to proceed in the reverse direction. This information can be useful in designing and optimizing reactions for specific purposes.

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