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Detonation trigger

  1. Feb 5, 2017 #1
    I just watched the documentary Trinity and Beyond where it showed footages of nuclear detonations. There were over 300 such tests between 1945 and 1970. Why didn't any accidental nuclear detonations occur in those tests. What kind of triggering device did they use to make the nukes explode? I don't think it is simply touching two wires together. But in those times.. there were no computer codes either. So how did the triggering button or signal work?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 6, 2017 #2

    etudiant

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    Gold Member

    The challenge in any implosion design is to get all elements to go off simultaneously. If they don't, things fizzle.
    If you look further, there are photos of the Trinity device festooned in cables prior to detonation. Those cables were to provide power to each detonator concurrently. There is an essential switch, called a krytron, which ensures simultaneous power to all.
     
  4. Feb 6, 2017 #3

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    Such complex systems, including rocket launching systems, have sets of interlocks to prevent accidental activation.
     
  5. Feb 6, 2017 #4
    any illustration or schematics of this interlock? this can also be applied to dynamites in mountains...
     
  6. Feb 6, 2017 #5

    Astronuc

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    Staff: Mentor

    No.
    In mining or excavation, charges are set, but are not attached to firing device until everyone is safely clear of the area. Same in demolition. The devices are well-known to the practitioners in their respective industries.
     
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