Diamond core in Jupiter

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Title says it all.

Main Question or Discussion Point

In a recent Scientific American article, Tammy Ma claims Jupiters core is solid diamond. She claims her work with lasers has demonstrated this. Any thoughts?
 

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  • #2
phinds
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In a recent Scientific American article, Tammy Ma claims Jupiters core is solid diamond. She claims her work with lasers has demonstrated this. Any thoughts?
My though is that when you ask about an article, you should post a link to the article.
 
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How do I do that, I'm an old fossil.
 
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berkeman
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How do I do that, I'm an old fossil.
Go to the web page where you read this. Click-Drag to copy the address (starts with "http://" or similar) in the address bar of your browser, and paste it into a reply here.

Also, it's best if you can find where in the article they link to the original peer-reviewed article, please also post a copy of that link here. We prefer to read the original paper, rather than the popoular press' interpretation of the scientific paper. Thanks. :smile:
 
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PAllen
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BillTre
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I read the same idea (diamond core of a gas giant) in a some Arthur C. Clarke book may years ago.
Doesn't make it science though.
 
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PAllen
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I read the same idea (diamond core of a gas giant) in a some Arthur C. Clarke book may years ago.
Doesn't make it science though.
Note, Tammy Ma is a reputable scientist, and the diamond core idea has been considered a possibility worth investigating by many in the field. But what I couldn’t find is any sign of new published evidence, nor of any general acceptance of the idea as anything more than a possibility.
 
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Note, Tammy Ma is a reputable scientist, and the diamond core idea has been considered a possibility worth investigating by many in the field. But what I couldn’t find is any sign of new published evidence, nor of any general acceptance of the idea as anything more than a possibility.
How would a "diamond core" model reconcile with the measured gravity harmonics determined by NASA's Juno mission? As far as I can tell those models preclude a pure solid core as presumably needed for a crystalline latice.
 
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PAllen
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How would a "diamond core" model reconcile with the measured gravity harmonics determined by NASA's Juno mission? As far as I can tell those models preclude a pure solid core as presumably needed for a crystalline latice.
This is not a field I know much about. I just did some internet searching because it seemed the OP wasn't going to. I found that the diamond core idea appeared to be taken seriously as a 'possibility' by many in the field, however I cannot speak to the specifics of your question.
 
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I would expect that gravity is sufficient to deform even a solid core over long distances, just like everywhere else.
 

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