Did they go bad?

russ_watters

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So I'm about to find out if a box of frozen [not precooked] chicken tenders thawed and went bad when I accidentally left them on my kitchen floor for 6 hours. How are my odds?

...Wish me luck!
 

Astronuc

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They should be OK.

I've eaten meat (beef, pork, chicken, fish) that has sat out for about 72 hrs on a kitchen counter, so I think 6 hrs is not a problem.
 
Is ordering delivery an option?

Good luck.
 
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Why would it go bad? 6 hours isnt long. It probably took at least two hours before they became room temp. Come on engineer...
 

russ_watters

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Why would it go bad? 6 hours isnt long. It probably took at least two hours before they became room temp. Come on engineer...
I'm an engineer, not a biologist. Actually, though, the box was still cool to the touch, so I wasn't too worried.
astronuc said:
I've eaten meat (beef, pork, chicken, fish) that has sat out for about 72 hrs on a kitchen counter, so I think 6 hrs is not a problem.
Yikes, I accidentally let meat thaw on the counter overnight about half the time (meaning to leave it out for a couple of hours, then put it in the fridge) and never eat it after that. I've opened packages of chicken that really smelled after that much time.
 
The bacterial colonies begin to grow after T > 40 degrees F.

http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/fssummer.html [Broken]

"The key is to never let your picnic food remain in the "Danger Zone" - between 40° F and 140° F - for more than 2 hours, or 1 hour if outdoor temperatures are above 90° F. This is when bacteria in food can multiply rapidly, and lead to foodborne illness."
 
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Evo

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Just think of what people ate before the days of refrigeration.
 

Danger

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Jeez, but you guys are wimps. We leave our left-overs out overnight all the time, and sometimes for a couple of days. Something frozen gets tossed into a sink of cold water for at least 8 hours to thaw it out enough for cooking.
 
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I'm an engineer, not a biologist. Actually, though, the box was still cool to the touch, so I wasn't too worried. Yikes, I accidentally let meat thaw on the counter overnight about half the time (meaning to leave it out for a couple of hours, then put it in the fridge) and never eat it after that. I've opened packages of chicken that really smelled after that much time.
Cough cough, you do thermal design. :wink:

How cold to you think those packages are when you get them at the grocery store sitting on the shelf all day long. There not nearly as cold as your freezer. There just a little below room temp. There just 'cool'.
 
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russ_watters

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Hmm...that last one didn't taste quite right.
 

russ_watters

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How cold to you think those packages are when you get them at the grocery store sitting on the shelf all day long. There not nearly as cold as your freezer.
I should hope so - otherwise that "Frozen Food Section" has a serious false advertising issue! :tongue:
 

russ_watters

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Just think of what people ate before the days of refrigeration.
Beef Jerky?
Danger said:
Jeez, but you guys are wimps. We leave our left-overs out overnight all the time, and sometimes for a couple of days.
I also still have all my original teeth - you should try teasing me for that too! :uhh:
 

Danger

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I also still have all my original teeth
So do I, with the exception of 2 wisdom teeth that I got yarded out about 6 years ago, and half of a front one that succumbed to a misplaced hockey stick. :biggrin:
 

turbo

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You're safe, Russ. 6 hours at room temp to defrost is not excessive, considering the mass of the package and the fact that the interior (very cold, if not frozen) product was refrigerating the outer portions of the package. While thawing, the internal portions were drawing heat from the outer portions to supply the latent heat needed to make the phase-change from frozen to thawed.
 
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How many engineers/chemists/physicsits does it take to thaw out a chicken.

Sorry mathematicians, you don't count....you integrate.
 

turbo

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How many engineers/chemists/physicsits does it take to thaw out a chicken.

Sorry mathematicians, you don't count....you integrate.
One. And two ER nurses and an overworked intern to counter the salmonella poisoning if the E/C/P really screws up.
 

Danger

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How many engineers/chemists/physicsits does it take to thaw out a chicken.
Or one of me with half a kilo of thermite...
 

turbo

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Or one of me with half a kilo of thermite...
Won't the chicken be a *bit* over-done? And dispersed enough so that it would be hard to gather for consumption?
 

Astronuc

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Just think of what people ate before the days of refrigeration.
Well my dad would slaughter a chicken just after church and mom would prepare (including cooking) so it would be ready for lunch after church. We lived next door to the church.

We made a lot of preservatives or picked directly from the garden.

Otherwise, before refrigeration, dried, dried/smoked, or dried/salted was the way to go.
 

Danger

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Won't the chicken be a *bit* over-done? And dispersed enough so that it would be hard to gather for consumption?
The trick is in the proper distribution of the thermite.
 

turbo

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My mother and I processed and canned a lot of vegetables when I was a kid, and we salted down a lot of stuff in jars, including scallions, leeks, etc. We had a big chest freezer, but we needed that to store berries, fruits, fiddleheads, venison, and shares of pigs/beef, etc that we got through cooperation with our families. We also had a large potato bin in our dirt-floored, dry rock-walled cellar, and we buried root vegetables in wooden boxes filled with sand buried in the dirt floor. I grew up in the age of refrigeration, but not in the age of "adequate" refrigeration for long-term storage.
 

turbo

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The trick is in the proper distribution of the thermite.
Ah! When I was a youngster, I played around with exothermic reactions a bit. Probably a good thing that I did not have access to thermite. "Boys will be boys" is not a valid response to the loss of a home, barn, out-buildings, etc.
 

lisab

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Danger

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"Boys will be boys" is not a valid response to the loss of a home, barn, out-buildings, etc.
In retrospect, I agree. You wouldn't believe how many shotgun-powder rockets we fired around inside the house. Between things like that and early driving habits, it's bloody amazing that I'm still alive.

(For the benefit of non-gun nuts, I specified shotgun powder because it's slower-burning than other types.)
 
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Microwaving for an infinite amount of time at an infinite power will kill just about any bacteria.
 

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