Difference Between Gamma Decay & Photons

In summary, the conversation discusses the difference between gamma decay and photons. It is revealed that gamma decay is a type of radioactive decay in which gamma rays, which are high-energy photons, are emitted. The main difference between the two is that gamma decay is a type of decay while photons are a type of electromagnetic radiation. The term "gamma" for a photon originated from early observations of different types of rays, with gamma rays being discovered as a special type of photon.
  • #1
Kahsi
41
0
Hi!

I hope this is the correct section to post this question in.

What's the difference betwen [tex]\gamma-decay[/tex] and photons?

Thank you in advance.
 
Last edited:
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  • #2
"Gamma decay",or gamma radiation is typically high energy (gamma(sic)) photons...

Daniel.
 
  • #3
[tex]\gamma[/tex]-rays are high-energy photons. [tex]\gamma[/tex]-decay is a type of radioactive decay in which [tex]\gamma[/tex]-rays are emitted.
 
  • #4
So basicly nothing, except that the [tex]\gamma[/tex] photons have more energy?
 
  • #5
Yeah,they're on the high-energy part of the spectrum.

Daniel.
 
  • #6
So, thank you both for the help.
 
  • #7
Kahsi said:
So basicly nothing, except that the [tex]\gamma[/tex] photons have more energy?

If I'm understanding you correctly, then the difference is that one is a type of decay and the other is a type of electromagnetic radiation. The [tex]\gamma[/tex] rays emitted in [tex]\gamma[/tex] decay are examples of photons, but they're a special type of photon (high-energy, as dexter pointed out).
 
  • #8
The term "gamma" for a photon dates back to the early days of experimental radioactivity. Three types of ray, behaving differentlly in a magnetic field, were observed. They were called alpha, beta, and gamma. The gamma rays, which were undeflected, were later found out to be photons. Lower energy photons had already been observed, since the sixth day of creation, as light.
 

Related to Difference Between Gamma Decay & Photons

What is the difference between Gamma Decay and Photons?

Gamma decay and photons are both forms of electromagnetic radiation, but they differ in their origin and energy levels. Gamma decay is a nuclear process in which an unstable nucleus releases energy in the form of high-energy photons, while photons are particles of electromagnetic radiation that can have a range of energies depending on their source.

How are Gamma Decay and Photons produced?

Gamma rays are produced through the decay of an unstable atomic nucleus, typically in a process known as gamma decay. On the other hand, photons can be produced by a variety of sources such as stars, light bulbs, or even electronic devices.

Do Gamma Decay and Photons have the same energy levels?

No, they do not. Gamma decay produces high-energy photons with wavelengths in the range of 0.01 to 10 nanometers, while photons from other sources can have a much wider range of energy levels and wavelengths.

Which one is more harmful, Gamma Decay or Photons?

Both gamma decay and photons can be potentially harmful if exposed to high levels of radiation. However, gamma rays are more energetic and can penetrate deeper into the body, making them more hazardous than photons from other sources.

Can Gamma Decay be converted into usable energy like Photons?

No, gamma decay cannot be converted into usable energy like photons. Gamma decay is a natural process that occurs in the nuclei of atoms, while photons can be harnessed and converted into usable energy through various methods such as solar panels or photoelectric cells.

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