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Differentiation help

  1. Oct 27, 2014 #1
    hi,

    is it possible to solve the following equation,

    dy = dx/dt

    for relation between y and x?

    thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 27, 2014 #2

    Nugatory

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    Staff: Mentor

    You'll have to tell us more. Where did you find that equation? In what context does this problem come up? What else do you know about x and y?
     
  4. Oct 27, 2014 #3

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    I've never seen an equation like this, with a differential on one side and a derivative on the other.
     
  5. Oct 27, 2014 #4

    HallsofIvy

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    In fact, you can't have an equation of that form. In terms of "non-standard analysis" a differential and "ordinary" function are different orders of objects and cannot be equal.

    (You can say that [itex]dy= \frac{dy}{dx}\frac{dx}{dt} dt[/itex] because there are differentials on both sides.)
     
  6. Oct 28, 2014 #5
    let's take dy = k dx/dt where k is a constant, can then the value of y in terms of x or vice versa be solved?

    i think it is possible to solve this, asking the physics and mathematicians who have encountered such problem

    mathematicians help out here!!

    thanks
     
  7. Oct 28, 2014 #6

    HallsofIvy

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    You have already been told by the "physics and mathematicians" out there that such a combination of symbols is meaningless- the two sides of the purported "equation" are different types of objects and so cannot be equal. That would be asking to solve "green= C sharp".

    What reason do you have, after being told that the "equation" is meaningless, to "think it is possible to solve this"?
     
  8. Oct 28, 2014 #7
    i think that any two quantities x and y once appears with equality equation like that should have solution
     
  9. Oct 28, 2014 #8

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    The question has been asked and answered, so I'm closing this thread.
     
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