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Dipole-dipole attraction

  1. May 12, 2017 #1

    yecko

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    Gold Member

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    8pFdEDX.png
    http://i.imgur.com/8pFdEDX.png

    2. Relevant equations
    polarity of the element

    3. The attempt at a solution
    BCl3 is a trigonal planar which the forces would be balanced. Thus it is a neutral substance.
    XeF4 is with tetrahedral shape where one side is a lone pair, which the charge is imbalanced and it has dipole dipole attraction between molecules.
    However, I don't know the other two - AsH3 and SCl3, which one is with dipole dipole attraction between molecules? And why? Thank you very much!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 12, 2017 #2

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    It is about shape of these molecules - are they symmetric enough to have a zero dipole moment?
     
  4. May 12, 2017 #3

    Ygggdrasil

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    A good starting point would be to draw the Lewis structures of each compound so that it's easier to figure out their geometry.
     
  5. May 12, 2017 #4

    yecko

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    Gold Member

    OK. I found AsH3 is with tetrahedral shape where one side is a lone pair, which the charge is imbalanced and it has dipole dipole attraction between molecules.

    However, i can't even draw the electron diagram of SCl3. It seems there is a non-paired electron. There also no resources on SCl3 on the Internet.
    The most similar structure I found is this one, SCl4. <https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/24/Sulfur_tetrachloride.svg >
    How to draw the Lewis structures of SCl3?
    Thanks
     
  6. May 15, 2017 #5

    Ygggdrasil

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    I agree, SCl3 does not seem like it would be a stable compound. Can you check whether there was a typo in the question?
     
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