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Disintegrator residue?

  1. Jun 23, 2017 #1
    Our Hero has a disintegrator, invented by Dr. Someguy, and he fires it at rock blocking his path through a cave system. Would the disintegrated material be loose particles of dust or would it disappear? Disappearing would imply energy release of some quantity? Loose dust would be a possible choking hazard or gum up OH's gear? Thoughts, please.
     
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  3. Jun 23, 2017 #2

    phinds

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    "disappearing implying energy release" would likely be way beyond lethal so you'd best go with the dust
     
  4. Jun 23, 2017 #3
    I was wondering about "collateral damage", meaning "the shooter done killed hisself." I wonder if Dr. Someguy could have included a way of directing that energy away from the shooter.
     
  5. Jun 23, 2017 #4
    Even directing the energy away would be rough on anything else nearby. If you're talking about converting it to pure energy, you have to remember just how much energy is contained in matter. One gram of matter, converted to energy is equivalent to detonating a 43KT nuclear weapon.

    *Shoots a pebble*
    *Accidentally incinerates a city*
     
  6. Jun 23, 2017 #5
    So ... don't use it in doors?
     
  7. Jun 27, 2017 #6
    Dr Someguy should have included a user manual.

    If your disintegrator breaks the grain boundaries in the rock then you usually get silt and sand. You can see crystal grains on extruded pipe railings. Separated grains could be flakes or needles depending on how the material was processed. In order to really separate grains there has to be a gap which means it has to expand.
     
  8. Jun 28, 2017 #7
    He's terrible when it comes to things like that. Drives his intern, Igor, crazy.
    Any guesses as to the velocity of the particles?
     
  9. Jun 28, 2017 #8
    Why would there be much velocity? You may have to test it a few times. If you want velocity you can always add steam.

    Gravity can move sand and gravel quickly:
     
  10. Jun 29, 2017 #9
    Velocity because it's being separated from the parent mass. Just wondering at the initial velocity (very little, a heck of a lot, something in between) of the matter when that happens. There will be close quarters if this works, don't want Our Hero flayed alive by debris from the beam.
     
  11. Jun 29, 2017 #10

    DHF

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    Another idea is that the device could increase the matter's density, causing the molecules within the affected area to collapse together, perhaps even to neutron density. so zap a door and the door would seem to vanish, the matter the door was made of would still be there, it would just be a microscopic spec of material on the floor.
     
  12. Jun 29, 2017 #11

    Janus

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    It would depend on "how" the disintegrator works. For example, assume that it just cancels out inter-molecular bonds. The molecule themselves in the target are vibrating. Remove the bonds holding them together, and they will fly off at whatever speed and direction they were moving at the moment.
    If you just weaken the bonds, but not to the point where they break, you could soften or liquify the target.
     
  13. Jun 29, 2017 #12
    Say they needed a tunnel a meter across and ten meters long. There wouldn't be enough matter converted to "neutron density" to cause mobility problems?
     
  14. Jun 29, 2017 #13
    Any radiation issues with breaking the bonds?
     
  15. Jun 30, 2017 #14

    DHF

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    Most of what makes up matter is pretty much space, consider an actual neutron star, it has a mass greater then our own sun, yet on average, they are only a few kilometers across. Collapsing down 300sq. meters of rock would still take up a microscopic amount of space.
     
  16. Jun 30, 2017 #15
    What about 300 cubic meters of rock?

    ;)
     
  17. Jun 30, 2017 #16

    Janus

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    300 cubic meters of granite would compress to a cube ~134 micrometers across.

    The big problem will be what happens after this cube falls out of the influence of the beam. By itself it is not stable. That small an amount of neutronium won't have enough gravity to prevent the neutrons from decaying into a proton and electron via beta decay.
     
  18. Jun 30, 2017 #17
    Would it gain any relative velocity during that fall? Become a missile hazard?

    I could solve that if Our Hero is boring at a downward slant?
     
  19. Jun 30, 2017 #18

    DHF

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    I think the implication is a severe radiation hazard.
     
  20. Jun 30, 2017 #19
    Here is a disintegration video complete with high speed film:

     
  21. Jun 30, 2017 #20

    Janus

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    Let's put it this way. The 300 cubic meters of rock it converted to that tiny volume. Which falls to the floor of the tunnel. Once it hits the floor of the tunnel (which also is the outside edge of the boring ray.) it keeps going because it is so dense that the rock can not support it. It now starts to decay with a half-life of 15 min, producing protons and electrons. These will take up more room than the neutrons they decayed from. In other words the mass will be trying to revert to it original volume, but now is surrounded by more rock. Something is going to have to give, big time!
     
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