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Dissolving solids

  1. Feb 18, 2007 #1
    I would type the problem but it's really long. I just need to know what the two different results are for dissolving solids because I completely forgot. I think it has to do with if you can bring them back or not ?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 18, 2007 #2
    Are you asking about diffusion or solubility? It seems like you know what you are searching for better than we do, try google or wikipedia.
     
  4. Feb 18, 2007 #3
    I'm talking about solubilty. I've tried to look it up but i can't find any thing.
     
  5. Feb 18, 2007 #4
  6. Feb 19, 2007 #5
    Well every substance has a "Ksp" called the solubility which is the product of the concentrations of the products at equilibrium. Most substances will dissolve then go back to solid and redissolve, and based on different factors like temp, conc. of reactants, etc. they will reach a state of equilibrium, the values for the products at this point are the ksp.

    For example

    Take the Reaction
    aX -> Ca+ + Dx-

    [a+]^C[x-]^D = Ksp(solubility product) for compound aX

    Does that shed any light on this question? I think this is probably posted in the wrong area.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2007
  7. Feb 19, 2007 #6
    Ok, well, I think the wikipedia link helped a little bit. Thanks any way.
     
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