1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Distance Education for Physics

  1. Nov 30, 2013 #1
    Hi all,

    I am an employed graduate in Electronics and Communication Engineering (Master of Science from UK, Bachelor of Technology from India). I wish to study and obtain an undergraduate/graduate degree in physics through distance education (anywhere) or part time in India. I happened to go across a few while doing some search on my own.

    1. Open University - The fees is pretty high and the B.A/B.Sc Physics course is not available in India.
    2. A few open universities in India like Madhya Pradesh Open Univ, Netaji Subhas Open Univ etc. But I am not sure if they are quite good.
    3. I also saw a lot of certificate/diploma courses along with specific subject courses like Astronomy in the Centre for Independent and Distance Learning-Univ of Oklahoma.

    I would hence require advice on whether affordable (less than £1500 per year) degree courses for Physics which have sufficient content. Any alternative suggestions are welcome. Thanks in advance.

    Balu
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 1, 2013 #2
    Why do you want to do this? With a Master of Science in Electronics and Communication Engineering you must have covered a lot of the material in a physics course anyway, and have the intellectual ability to approach UG physics through self study. Do you need the qualification to do a physics PhD? You may be able to do that anyway, in some areas. For instance, look at:

    http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AHS922/ma...earcher-phd-studentships-in-optics-photonics/

    "The applicant must have a good background in theoretical and experimental optics and expected to have graduated in Physics (Optics) or Electrical and Electronic Engineering." You might not have the optics experience for that one, but it is an example where a physics or engineering degree will get you into doing physics research (not uncommon!)

    If you just want to learn some physics and talk about it, then you are in the right place already (physics forum), and that's free!
     
  4. Dec 3, 2013 #3
    Thank you Mal. I duly understand the fact that self study shall suffice in most cases, especially Experimental Physics related to Electronics. I had initially planned to give minimum 2 years time to learn on my own, assess my level of knowledge and start looking for a PhD. But my work does not give me time to do this on a regular basis. I hence felt if I had a structured course with modules and exams it would require a dedicated and well planned time-schedule from my part.

    For counter argument sake, real focus does not require a course for learning. Nevertheless, I can spare 2-3 hrs of free time daily for studies and since the exam based learning system is somewhat hard-wired into my system I feel it will suit me best. In my opinion fundamental learning requires a systematic approach. Once you get a know how of things you can slowly go into a free thinking mode.

    And yes you are right, the forums here will benefit me and others; not merely the career advice but by sharing and learning ideas and topics as well.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Distance Education for Physics
  1. Physics Education (Replies: 4)

Loading...