Distance travelled by light

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

Is it true that the distance traveled by light during a particular time period is expressed by d=tc^2 where d is the distance travelled in metres and t is the elapsed time in seconds?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
834
2
Distance = time x speed

What you wrote is the equivalent of distance = time x speed^2. That doesn't make sense.
 
  • #3
Sorry the time is in Planck time not seconds. My mistake.
 
  • #4
834
2
The Planck time is still a time. The equation makes no sense just on dimensional grounds. A time multiplied by a speed squared doesn't give a distance, regardless of units.
 
  • #5
The Planck time is still a time. The equation makes no sense just on dimensional grounds. A time multiplied by a speed squared doesn't give a distance, regardless of units.
Well it does work. The units all balance.
 
  • #6
834
2
By all means, if the units do balance, then I am here to learn. Show me.
 
  • #7
Sorry I messed up.

It should be dc^3 = tc^2.

That's where I needed the cubed value.
 
  • #8
834
2
speed = distance / time

Distance x (distance^3)/(time^3) is not equal to (time)x(distance^2)/(time^2), right?
 
  • #9
Sorry scrub that I have mixed up two sets of equations. It is 12.53 AM here.
 

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