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DIYer need help with chemical question

  1. Jun 15, 2015 #1
    What is a liquid, gas, gel, (substance) etc. that cools when it meets electric current? Thank you all for the help.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 15, 2015 #2

    Drakkith

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    Staff: Mentor

    Well, there's the thermoelectric effect, but I'm not sure that's what you're wanting. Are you asking if there's a substance that just cools itself off when an electric current flows through it? Are you wanting this for some kind of project?
     
  4. Jun 15, 2015 #3
    Thanks for the reply Drakkith... Yes, I'm working on a project where I need an enclosed tube, that will be inaccessible after the project is completed, that will have an electric wire inside, and I need to fill the tube with a substance (solid, liquid or gas) so that when current is pushed through the wire the reaction with the substance cools the tube.
     
  5. Jun 16, 2015 #4

    Borek

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    I don't think it is possible. At least not the way you describe it. Passing current in general heats things up, not cools them down. Theoretically speaking passing current could trigger some highly endothermic reaction, but the effect will be most likely irreversible - that is, you will be able to do it just once. It could be possible to "recharge" the system (something similar in principle to thiosulfate hand warmers), but I can't think of any substance that will behave the way you need even irreversibly, not to mention the latter case..
     
  6. Jun 16, 2015 #5

    DrDu

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    Did you consider to use a Peltier element?
     
  7. Jun 16, 2015 #6
    Thank you very much for your reply...
     
  8. Jun 16, 2015 #7
    I had never ever hear of a Peltier element... I'm reading up on it right now and this might be what I'm looking for!!! Thank you and I'll keep you posted.
     
  9. Jun 16, 2015 #8

    Borek

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    Just remember Peltier element is cold on one side, but hot on the other. Your initial description suggested you want something that gets cold as a whole.
     
  10. Jun 16, 2015 #9
    Thanks Borek... Reading up on Peltier element is making me re-envision what I'm trying to accomplish and gave me an idea of how to implement it... Thank you all!
     
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