Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Do cold blooded animals do best in cold weather? or hotblooded?

  1. Feb 3, 2004 #1
    i wasnt sure where to post this...
    but ive been really curious about this since i am always the one that isnt cold...

    I was wondering if the animals that live in cold weather are hotblooded or cold blooded... like penguins for example and if there really is a pattern.

    also i was wondering what makes it that certain people feel cold more than others
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 3, 2004 #2

    chroot

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Penguins are class Aves (birds), and are warm-blooded.

    The deal is this: life depends on the action of enzymes, special proteins which catalyze chemical reactions. Many, if not all, enzymes are sensitive to temperature. If they are too hot or too cold, they either break down or stop functioning.

    Warm-blooded animals produce their own body heat, so as to always keep their enzymes at the optimal temperature. Cold-blooded animals cannot do this. As the temperature falls, cold-blooded animals become disabled. They cannot move their muscles, or digest their food, or transport oxygen to their tissues. You can see evidence of this in your garden: when it's cold out, lizards and other cold-blooded reptiles are not nearly as fast or responsive as when it's warm.

    In short, cold-blooded animals must live in warm climates; warm-blooded animals can more or less live anywhere.

    - Warren
     
  4. Feb 3, 2004 #3

    Monique

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Well said, but.. lizards in my garden??? pfiew! I am glad to say no cold-blooded animals live in my garden

    What makes it that certain people feel warm and others cold? It all depends on how much they are wearing, how much subcutaneous isolating fat they have. And besides that some people's metabolism is just faster so they burn more fuel and produce more heat :)
     
  5. Feb 3, 2004 #4

    Bystander

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Excepting certain fish --- trout, char, other salmonids, and other critters.
     
  6. Feb 3, 2004 #5

    chroot

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Dag, Monique. :)

    You don't have lizards in your garden?? Here in the states we have them all over! They're so much fun. :smile:

    - Warren
     
  7. Feb 4, 2004 #6
    Strangely enough the coldest locations on earth are swarming with more cold blooded animals than warm blooded ones.

    In the artic and antartic the most obviously visible animals might be seals, penguins and other warm blooded animals, but they all depend on cold blooded creatures to keep their warm blooded motors running. Krill (shrimps in the antartic) is one of the most numerous animals on this planet and they are cold blooded and live in a cold sea.
    Underneath the ice there is a world filled with cold blooded animals. They easily outnumber the warm blooded ones, since the warm blooded ones need the cold blooded ones to sustain themselves.

    Why are the cold blooded ones a succes? Because they do not waste energy like the warm blooded ones. They don't grow fast, but they are efficient. They don't waste enegy heating themselves.
     
  8. Feb 4, 2004 #7

    FZ+

    User Avatar

    The locations are not swarming with cold blooded animals. They are swimming with cold blooded animals. In the water, the temperature cannot be lower than 0 centigrade. Hence, on the surface where it is really cold, there are almost no cold blooded organisms.
     
  9. Feb 4, 2004 #8
    cool thanx all!

    all of it makes sense... the enzymes... the metabolism... good to know that i have a good metabolism :)
     
  10. Feb 5, 2004 #9
    those other cold places you mention are also not swarming with warmblooded animals, and they are still depended on the 'swimming' coldblooded ones nearby in the freezing ocean.

    I would suggest that you try swimming in 0 centigrade water naked and then stand in 0 centigrade on land naked. You might notice that you die sooner in the cold water than on land. Much sooner. All cold places need adaptations. Cold water has certain characteristics that make it really 'cold', such as ease of heat transduction. On land there are other problems.
     
  11. Feb 5, 2004 #10

    Tsu

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    So true! And they are very beneficial to your garden, eating some of the bugs that like to hold banquets on your plants! Their legless buddies (garter snakes) help to keep the rodent population down so they don't chew up the stalks of your plants and trees! GOOD little friends they ARE!!!
     
  12. Feb 5, 2004 #11

    NateTG

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    You're almost certain to have worms in the soil which are exothermic.
     
  13. Feb 5, 2004 #12

    Monique

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Exothermic worms??? What is meant by that??? I'm exothermic too.. Last time I checked exothermic meant 'producing heat'
     
  14. Feb 5, 2004 #13

    NateTG

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exothermic

    Perhaps 'ectotherm' is preferred?
     
  15. Feb 5, 2004 #14

    chroot

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    And your epidermis is showing!!!!

    - Warren
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Do cold blooded animals do best in cold weather? or hotblooded?
  1. A Cold (Replies: 7)

Loading...