Do you drink coffee?

  1. I've been performing a little experiment on my self lately. I would routinely drink 1-2 cups a day, so I decided to give it up to see what would happen. Even after two weeks of letting my body forget about the addiction, I feel much more unmotivated and tired. Then I started thinking about how caffeine works. It not only blocks out certain chemicals (adenosine) in the brain that signal sleepiness, it actually stimulates the adenosine detectors in the process. So I've reasoned that even if my body becomes immune to the stimulation effects of caffeine, it will still help block the adenosine that would have normally been detected without it.

    Does this reasoning sound logical? They say that given a long enough use, you will need caffeine just to feel "normal". Is that entirely accurate given your experiences with drug?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Pythagorean

    Pythagorean 4,596
    Gold Member

    That's an interesting thought. Can you cite any sources about how caffeine "stimulates" adenosine detectors? Presumably it's the same receptors they act as an antagonist for?

    This is often explained by homeostasis. For example, the less adenosine your body thinks it's getting, the more receptors it will make. Then you have too many receptors and, without coffee, you're getting too much adenosine. I don't know if that's the case for caffeine.
     
  4. Evo

    Staff: Mentor

    Caffeine blocks adenosine receptors, so more receptors may be produced,

    Please do not post without linking to approved articles that explain and back up what you post. It seems you have no need to worry.


    Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/scien...ted-to-caffeine-26861037/#6T6oqXe5hFUfTcZq.99
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2014
  5. Pythagorean

    Pythagorean 4,596
    Gold Member

    This is a typical symptom of addiction and caffeine is an addictive substance, so I don't think it's that out of line.
     
  6. Evo

    Staff: Mentor

    Lol Pyth, we're posting basically the same thing on top of each other. The Smithsonian article I posted explains it all in simple terms, feel free to add others if you have them.
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2014
Know someone interested in this topic? Share a link to this question via email, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?

0
Draft saved Draft deleted