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Do you get musical chills?

  1. Jul 1, 2010 #1

    fuzzyfelt

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    I’d previously read information about musical chills, (“Chills (goose bumps) have been repeatedly associated with positive emotional peaks. Chills seem to be related to distinct musical structures and the reward system in the brain.”)

    http://musicweb.hmt-hannover.de/kopiez/Grewe_etal(2009)ChillsEmotionalPeaks_NYAS_1169.pdf

    but didn’t know a few things, like other names for the experience and, particularly, that not everyone experiences it, which I find hard to believe (in various samples roughly half and down to 37% only, reported experiencing it, compared to 90% of music students).

    http://www.cogsci.msu.edu/DSS/2008-2009/Huron/HuronFrisson.pdf
    (linked to in another thread).

    I thought it might be interesting to take a sample here of those who do or don’t experience it, or who may admit to, given the alternative names it has been given, etc. (I would understand any unwillingness to participate.) Some questions for affirmative answers would be-
    1. Do you play any instruments?
    2. Which genres do you like?

    I do experience it, and play instruments and generally like all genres I know of, but probably less so music with lyrics that are overtly emotional.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2010
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 1, 2010 #2
    I used to experience it, but I haven't in two years or so. Maybe I haven't heard good enough music.
     
  4. Jul 1, 2010 #3
    Yes, I did experience it, but only with classical music.
     
  5. Jul 1, 2010 #4
  6. Jul 1, 2010 #5
    I have experienced it many times. I dont play any instrument, and dont know any of the technicalities of music - I generally consider myself very unmusical. I think I have experienced it with nearly every genre except for punk and metal which I dont care for.
     
  7. Jul 1, 2010 #6

    fuzzyfelt

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    Great, 4 out of 4 so far!!
    I imagine I would really miss it.
    Seems I'm not very fussy, but probably feel it more with classical music.
    Thanks. One of the papers mentions Jussi Bjorling, amongst other pieces. I think this was the recording that introduced me to the feeling.


    That is interesting, considering whether or not knowledge of music is a prerequisite.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  8. Jul 1, 2010 #7

    Danger

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    It has happened to me, usually because it reminds me of a situation or even a specific incident. For instance, when I hear 'Born to Run' I feel that 440 in my Roadrunner throbbing. I don't even want to mention what I feel when I hear Bonnie Tyler or Laura Brannigan.:tongue2:
     
  9. Jul 1, 2010 #8
    I guess its hard to call myself completely unmusical, I listen to it for hours a day. I very much seek it out and explore new genres, know alot of the history and connections and sounds. But I have no idea how or inkling to play anything. I have no idea what terms like stanza, tone and tambre really mean and dont have any idea what particular notes sound like.

    I get the same chills with other art forms as well, particularly literature. I think thats what gives me the chills most often, the written word or even oral speech with a profound idea.
     
  10. Jul 1, 2010 #9

    wolram

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    I just listened to some of my favorites but none give me any chills, sorry.
     
  11. Jul 1, 2010 #10

    Danger

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    I copy you on that, Academic. Regarding my musical talent, I'm just now learning to play the radio. I'm hoping that sometime next year I will graduate to remedial tape-deck.
    When I read any of Martin Caidin's stuff (my favourite), I feel the aeroplane wrapped around my body. It was because of his books that I learned to fly, and his descriptions still give me chills.
     
  12. Jul 1, 2010 #11
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2017
  13. Jul 1, 2010 #12
    I play violin and I only get them when I hear really really good players. I get it every time I hear Mendelssohn violin concerto played by David Oistrakh.
     
  14. Jul 1, 2010 #13

    fuzzyfelt

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    I think that is 6 out of 7!

     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2010
  15. Jul 1, 2010 #14

    Danger

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    Glueball, I bet that you would love Marc Wood's stuff.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Wood_(violinist [Broken])
    "Monkeybats" from his "Voodoo Magic" album just blows my mind.

    Okay, that's not quite classical... but check it out anyhow.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  16. Jul 1, 2010 #15

    lisab

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    I experience it too, frequently, in fact. But I always thought it was just due to emotion, not the structure of the music. It's very mood-dependent, though. And I can get it from any genre.
     
  17. Jul 1, 2010 #16

    lisab

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    Ahaha....right after I posted that, "Zombie" (Cranberries) came on the radio...yep, got 'em.
     
  18. Jul 1, 2010 #17

    fuzzyfelt

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    7 out of 8!
    Yes, reports that it happens infrequently didn't seem right to me either. I had always linked it with structure, however. And I agree about it being mood-dependent, and being able to give the music your attention, I think.
     
  19. Jul 1, 2010 #18

    Danger

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    I think (with no medical or biochemical background to support it) that the ears might be connected in a fundamental way to the limbic system. Scent evokes incredibly complex memories that are otherwise buried in the subconscious mind. Perhaps sounds have the same effect.
     
  20. Jul 1, 2010 #19

    Dembadon

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    [off-topic]
    Is that not the most difficult song to get out of one's head?
    [/off-topic]

    I get them when a singer hits a particularly high/difficult note. I've had them from instruments as well, but vocals are the usual catalyst.
     
  21. Jul 1, 2010 #20

    Danger

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    Minnie Ripperton must have driven you almost to the point of orgasm. She and Jack Smith (Wolfman Jack) were the only people that I've heard of who had 8-octave vocal ranges.
     
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