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Does the converse of Lenz's Law act to compensate for E flux?

  1. Oct 4, 2011 #1
    Lenz's Law says that the induced emf from a change in B flux creates a B field that compensates for the flux change. I know that a changing E field induces a magnetic field as well, but does that magnetic field act in a way to compensate for the change in the E field? Or is that not physically possible? If it does do that, then why is there no minus sign in Maxwell's law of induction

    [itex]\oint[/itex]B[itex]\cdot[/itex]ds=[itex]\mu[/itex][itex]_{0}[/itex][itex]\epsilon[/itex][itex]_{0}[/itex][itex]\frac{d\Phi_{E}}{dt}[/itex]


    like there is a minus sign in Faraday's law of induction?

    [itex]\oint[/itex]E[itex]\cdot[/itex]ds=-[itex]\frac{d\Phi_{B}}{dt}[/itex]

    If possible, please keep the answer at the intro E&M level. Much thanks in advance
     
  2. jcsd
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