Does the physical universe exist before conception and after death?

In summary, the conversation discusses the idea of conception and death as the boundaries of life in terms of conventional physics. It presents two perspectives - one where an outside observer exists beyond the span of life, and one where the observer is created and dies along with the individual. The conversation also mentions the projection of the macrocosm onto a microcosm and the concept of the soul as a single entity hidden within the body. The question of whether one can accommodate both perspectives is raised, and the conversation concludes with the idea that one must exist in order to experience and that the identity we experience is that of a single entity within the body.
  • #1
Loren Booda
3,125
4
If conception and death can be defined as the bounds of life in terms of conventional physics,

either 1.) there must be, as we have all witnessed, an outside observer to ascertain (measure) them, and thus some external universe exists beyond this span of life. Observers would neither be conserved nor be essential to the overall existence of the universe.

or 2.) contrariwise, if we as observers fail to exist before and after life, then we cannot maintain our former worldview and with it our exhaustively unique universe. We would need a big bang and big crunch to accompany the creation and demise of the observer, i. e., their conservation would be of global consequence. This 2nd perspective may exist with the individual undergoing the life transformation, rather than the lovers or grievers at conception or death with the 1st. These relative viewpoints are reminiscent of observers approaching closely to or at a distance from a black hole.

Can one accommodate both of these positions? Possibly we carry with us the projection of the macrocosm onto a microcosm, in which case the concerns above are more compatible.
 
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  • #2
Loren Booda said:
If conception and death can be defined as the bounds of life in terms of conventional physics,

either 1.) there must be, as we have all witnessed, an outside observer to ascertain (measure) them, and thus some external universe exists beyond this span of life. Observers would neither be conserved nor be essential to the overall existence of the universe.

or 2.) contrariwise, if we as observers fail to exist before and after life, then we cannot maintain our former worldview and with it our exhaustively unique universe. We would need a big bang and big crunch to accompany the creation and demise of the observer, i. e., their conservation would be of global consequence. This 2nd perspective may exist with the individual undergoing the life transformation, rather than the lovers or grievers at conception or death with the 1st. These relative viewpoints are reminiscent of observers approaching closely to or at a distance from a black hole.

Can one accommodate both of these positions? Possibly we carry with us the projection of the macrocosm onto a microcosm, in which case the concerns above are more compatible.
Do you REALLY believe you didn't exist before birth? Do you REALLY think you will cease to exist when you die?

One must exist in order to experience, and the fact that you experience is convincing proof you exist.

Your body is not a single "thing". It is comprised of billions of elemental particles - individual existences each with its own identity. Two independent elements cannot share their existence or experience a common identity any more than they could simultaneously occupy the same space. It is not possible to 'be' more than (or less than) a single existence, so the identity you experience must be that of a single element - or entity - hidden within the assemblage of your body.

This isn't rocket science. It has nothing to do with religion. It is simple reasoning and elementary deduction. You are a single entity - an elemental particle which some call a 'soul'. You don't have a soul, you are a soul. And while you are alive, you have a body. When you die, it will fall off (which can be VERY embarrassing as well as downright inconvenient).

http://theory-of-reciprocity.com/sum.htm
 
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1. Does the physical universe exist before conception and after death?

This is a philosophical question that has been debated for centuries. From a scientific perspective, the answer is that we do not have concrete evidence to prove the existence or non-existence of the physical universe before conception or after death. It is ultimately a matter of personal belief and interpretation.

2. Can science provide any evidence for the existence of the physical universe before conception and after death?

Science is based on empirical evidence and the scientific method, which focuses on observable and measurable phenomena. As the physical universe before conception and after death falls outside of our ability to observe and measure, science cannot provide evidence for or against its existence.

3. What do scientists believe about the existence of the physical universe before conception and after death?

As individuals, scientists may have their own personal beliefs about the existence of the physical universe before conception and after death. However, as scientists, they recognize that it is a philosophical rather than a scientific question and do not base their research or findings on these beliefs.

4. Is there any scientific research on the concept of the physical universe before conception and after death?

There is currently no scientific research on the concept of the physical universe before conception and after death. As it is a philosophical question, it falls outside of the realm of scientific study. However, there may be philosophical or religious studies on this topic.

5. How does the concept of the physical universe before conception and after death relate to scientific theories like the Big Bang and evolution?

The Big Bang and evolution are scientific theories that explain the development and existence of the physical universe as we know it. They do not address the concept of the physical universe before conception or after death. These theories are based on observable and measurable evidence, while the concept of the physical universe before conception and after death is not. Therefore, they are not directly related.

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