Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Dog wind

  1. May 25, 2005 #1

    wolram

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    My pooch benji, the most loveable and gentle red setter wolfhound cross
    in the world, has started making our lives a misery, when he breaks wind
    it is the most awful smell imaginable, i have changed his diet several times
    but it makes no difference, the vet tells me he is in good health, so anyone
    have an idea? we are fed up living with all the doors and windows open .
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 25, 2005 #2

    Mk

    User Avatar

    That's what my parents say.
     
  4. May 25, 2005 #3

    wolram

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    About your dog ?

    i cant imagine another possibility
     
  5. May 25, 2005 #4

    Mk

    User Avatar

    I ment about me.
     
  6. May 25, 2005 #5

    wolram

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I doubt if a human could create an aroma like benji, but then again :yuck:
     
  7. May 25, 2005 #6

    Danger

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Superglue and a cork.
     
  8. May 25, 2005 #7

    brewnog

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Bury the dog.
     
  9. May 25, 2005 #8

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    What types of diet have you changed him to? Going from one cheap dog food with lots of fillers to another is still going to result in the same problem. Also, how long have you kept him on the new diet each time? Adjusting to a new diet can take a week or so, especially if it's abrupt (vets usually recommend gradually mixing the old and new food together with increasing proportions of the new food so it's not an abrupt change in diet).

    Is anyone sneaking the dog table food, or other snacks? Does the kid who doesn't like vegetables always manage to miraculously clean his plate when your back is turned?

    Otherwise, I guess you could invest in gas masks and room fresheners. :tongue2:
     
  10. May 25, 2005 #9

    wolram

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Moonbear

    It has been going on for over a year now and i have been following the vets
    advice on diet, he wont eat veg, but does have a treat now and then, maybe
    a digestive biscuit.
    Im sure a chemist could not reproduce the smell from what he eats, if he could it would be a cheap way of controlling riots.
     
  11. May 25, 2005 #10

    Math Is Hard

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

  12. May 25, 2005 #11
    When the dog breaks wind...you do the same...yeah!

    Competition helps sometimes!!
     
  13. May 25, 2005 #12

    wolram

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Hey a helpful suggestion thanks, hope it works
     
  14. May 25, 2005 #13

    wolram

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I would have to move into a tent.
     
  15. May 25, 2005 #14

    dextercioby

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    We got a thread on stinky feet,now one on dog farting,what's next...?:uhh: (*worried,opens the window*)

    Daniel.
     
  16. May 25, 2005 #15
    I would bet that the offending gas is the usual suspect in these cases: H2S. It takes so very little of a sulfur compound to produce problematic quantities of this pungent gas that, as long as his system is dedicated to finding the sulfur and binding it with hydrogen, you probably won't be able to affect this problem by controling what he eats. I don't think you'd be able to find completely sulfur-free food.

    What Math Is Hard suggested is probably the best avenue to explore: some kind of additive to what he eats that would somehow obviate the production of hydrogen sulfide gas.
     
  17. May 25, 2005 #16

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Worth a try. I'm laughing that the link talks about pugs...my sister has one of those little windbags! I'm always astounded at how much gas one little dog can produce; we could probably keep the house heated all winter on that dog's methane emissions! If the dog's intestinal flora are off-kilter, that could explain excessive gas production. Was the dog on any antibiotics near the time the problem began?
     
  18. May 25, 2005 #17

    wolram

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    No the only medication he has is the occasional doc martins, i have had
    dogs or been around them since i was a kid, but i have never come across
    one that can evacuate a room in one second flat, the trouble is they are
    silent and have time to permeate the room before you can hold your breath.
    some times he looks at his bum then at me as if to say, i am guilty but whats
    the fuss about.
     
  19. May 25, 2005 #18

    Danger

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    How about activated charcoal suppositories? :uhh:

    If nothing works, just insert a kazoo and let him keep you entertained. :biggrin:
     
  20. May 25, 2005 #19
    Acidophilus, you can get it at the healthfood store, and mixed with milk at many grocery stores. My little dog{18lbs} drinks about 1/4 of a cup a week, and never any gas problems.
    I started drinking it to help with heartburn. It really helps humans too!
     
  21. May 26, 2005 #20

    wolram

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Another great tip, thanks, come to think i do feel a bit windy myself
    :smile:
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Dog wind
  1. Dog pee! (Replies: 6)

  2. The Dog Whisperer (Replies: 14)

  3. Sun dogs (Replies: 5)

  4. Cats and dogs (Replies: 17)

  5. Dog Survey (Replies: 17)

Loading...