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Doing Master degree in US

  1. Jun 18, 2007 #1
    This year I'll join B.Sc.(Hons) Physics. Its a 3 year course. I've heard that for doing a master degree in US requires 4 years of study. Will I be able to do master deg in US.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 18, 2007 #2
    A masters takes 2 years.
     
  4. Jun 18, 2007 #3
    No, he's asking if he can apply for a master degree in the US when his bachelor degree took only 3 years (compared to 4 years in the US).
     
  5. Jun 18, 2007 #4

    ZapperZ

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    I see a possible source of confusion here, and it stems from people not clearly indicating where they are, and what educational system they are used to. If you neglect to do that, then expect to get very confusing answers.

    In the US, a "Masters Degree" or M.Sc is a "GRADUATE" degree. It is something you enroll AFTER you have completed an undergraduate degree (i.e. you have a B.Sc). This normally takes 2 years to complete BEYOND the undergraduate degree.

    Now, this is not true elsewhere. In the UK, you can enroll, as an undergraduate, in a "M.Sc" degree, which often requires an extra year of undergraduate studies. Whether this is equivalent to what we call a Masters degree in the US depends entirely on the US institution that is evaluating that degree.

    I have written already a topic on this if people want to read it. Let this be a warning to everyone. There are people from all over the world on here, and if you neglect to explain where you are and what you are familiar with, many of the responses will assume one way or the other.

    Zz.
     
  6. Jun 18, 2007 #5
    Well, I don't know how about the OP, but I'm studying in Austria and we have a three year bachelor degrees here. After completing the bachelor degree you apply for a 2 year master degree (and after that you can apply for a 3 year Phd.).

    As far as I know the usual bachelor degree in the US takes 4 years. Now the question is (and I think that is what the OP is also asking) can you apply for a master degree in the US when your bachelor degree took only 3 years?
     
  7. Jun 18, 2007 #6

    ZapperZ

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    Most US universities only care that you have the appropriate baccalaureate degree. How long it takes for you to get that is irrelevant. If you don't have the sufficient background, you just won't pass your qualifier.

    Zz.
     
  8. Jun 18, 2007 #7

    cristo

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    I'm not sure that I agree there-- even in the UK, "MSc" degrees (for the majority) are graduate masters degrees; i.e. applicants to an MSc program are required to hold a bachelor degree. These masters degrees take one full year of study.

    Now, the undergraduate masters degrees that you are talking about are four year degrees and do not require a bachelors degree beforehand. (Officially these are classed as "higher first degrees," although they are each called "master of ...") On graduation, one obtains an undergraduate masters degree, and no bachelor degree. The easy way of differentiating between an undergrad masters and a postgrad masters is by the letters-- undergrad masters degress have letters "MSci, MPhys, MMath, MEng" as opposed to the postgrad masters "MSc."
     
  9. Jun 18, 2007 #8
    its just B.Sc. degree that takes 3 years. BE or BTech or anything takes 4 years(anywhere in the world, not in only US)
     
  10. Jun 18, 2007 #9

    ZapperZ

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    That is what I meant, the "undergraduate masters degree" but I didn't state it accurately. For those of us here in the US, an "undergraduate masters degree" sounds like an oxymoron, since a masters degree in anything always meant a post-graduate degree.

    Zz.
     
  11. Jun 19, 2007 #10
    Sorry for creating the confusion. I am from India. I hope I am much clear now. I can do M.Sc. in US after B.Sc. in India(whether B.Sc. is 3 or 4 year long). Please correct me if I have some misunderstanding.
     
  12. Jun 19, 2007 #11

    mgb_phys

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    That is correct Sourabh - the US Masters will accept you based on your degree and any entry tests they want to do.
    Assuming Indian degrees are similair to what UK ones used to be, you might be ahead of a similair US 4 year degree since US degrees generally require many more courses outside the speciality (major) whereas you probably studied nothing but physics+maths.
     
  13. Jun 20, 2007 #12
    thank you very much to all.
     
  14. Jun 20, 2007 #13

    ranger

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    Sourabh, I'm curious as to how your degree is only 3 yrs. What sort of things do they cut back on? Is it what mgb_phys said?
     
  15. Jun 20, 2007 #14

    cristo

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    I'm not sure it's that easy to say what is "cut back on" without knowing what's learnt in a typical US degree :wink:. Standard Bachelors degrees here (in the UK) are 3 years, and I've heard some people say that UK graduates have learnt "more" than their US counterparts, although this may just be a myth. It may be due to the reason that mgb_phys gives.
     
  16. Jun 20, 2007 #15

    Office_Shredder

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    Yes, UK schools require you to take a full workload of courses related to your major, without the option to do other classes.... compared to American universities, where they require you to take classes outside the scope of your degree.
     
  17. Jun 20, 2007 #16
    hellllllllooooooooooooooo. only B.Sc takes 3 yrs in india. all other degrees like BE or BTech takes 4
     
  18. Jun 20, 2007 #17
    hahaha, here too(in India, i mean) they teach you everything outside the scope of degree
     
  19. Jun 20, 2007 #18

    mgb_phys

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    In addition in UK schools from 16-18 you (used to) only take 3 courses specialising in the same thing as your degree.
    So from 16 you might do physics+maths+chemistry possibly further maths then in your degree only do physics.
    Most universities then require no other courses at all, I remember having to get special permission to take a computer science course and that was only allowed because it was a member of the physics dept teaching it.
     
  20. Jun 21, 2007 #19
    Though I have no idea of what the US degree holders learn I can show you my syllabus.

    The following is the semester-wise schedule of courses for the B.Sc. (Honours) Programme in Physics.

    Semester I
    Algebra I
    Calculus I
    Classical Mechanics I
    Humanities I
    Introduction to Programming
    Semester II
    Calculus II
    Classical Mechanics II
    Electromagnetism I
    Humanities II
    Statistical Physics I
    Semester III
    Mathematical Physics
    Calculus III
    Quantum Mechanics I
    Properties of Matter
    Semester IV
    Analysis II
    Electromagnetism II
    Quantum Mechanics II
    Atomic and Molecular Physics
    Semester V
    Quantum Mechanics III
    Statistical Physics II
    Laboratory I
    Optional I
    Semester VI
    Computational Methods
    Laboratory II
    Optional II
    Optional III

    If possible show me your syllabus also.
     
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