Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Domain/Range of a function

  1. Mar 4, 2009 #1
    What function has a domain consisting of all real numbers and a range from [0,1]?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 4, 2009 #2
    what kind of functions is it?

    for example, if its an identity function, you can say "y=x for all x from 0 to 1"

    also, if its a piecewise function, you can say "sin(x) for all x from 0 to pi, and sin(-x) for all x from pi to 2pi"


    I`m just answering the question for fun, and sure to help u; but wait others for more reliable answers
     
  4. Mar 4, 2009 #3
    There are many you can define.

    f(x) = x - floor(x) is one.
    g(x) = ceiling(x) - x is another.

    (notice that f(x) + g(x) = 1, except perhaps in the case of x an integer, depending on the particular definitions of floor and ceiling you're using).

    Other examples?

    h(x) = |sin x|
    i(x) = |cos x|
    j(x) = (sin x)^2
    k(x) = (cos x)^2

    Not feeling like a periodic answer?

    (l_n)(x) = exp(-x^2n), for any even integer n, defines a family of such functions.

    (m_q,n)(x) = x^n / (q+x^n), for any even integer n and any positive real number q

    Looking for something more exotic?

    let n(x) be the function which equals 0.5 if x is rational, and 1.0 otherwise.

    let o(x) be the function which gives the probability of two events both occurring if they are independent and have probabilities o(x/2) and o(2x).

    (just for fun, could somebody find a closed-form solution for this last function, if there is one? does it make sense, or is it missing a necessary "base case"? one can tell that that o(0) = 1, but... can the rest be found uniquely?)

    So, in response to the OP's question... pick your favorite.
     
  5. Mar 4, 2009 #4
    Lol, nevermind about that last question.

    It turns out the only such function is o(x) = 1...
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Domain/Range of a function
  1. Um, domains and ranges (Replies: 1)

Loading...