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News Donald Sterling incident

  1. May 1, 2014 #1
    He said in a private conversation that he does not like some specific race of people. He did not make any jokes or derogatory comment about any race. He was communicating his race preferences to his girlfriend in a private conversation.

    His racism part did not interfere with his NBA team hiring or any of that official in nature. (I'm specific about the recent incident, I'm not talking about a previous incident of him not renting his apartments to blacks or latinos.) From my (limited) knowledge, he has not done anything illegal.

    How is that conversation worse than, say, you as a parent prefers your kid to marry from your own race? I think the media over-hyped the whole incident.

    Also if they banned him for life long, why should he pay the fine? :confused:
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2014
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  3. May 1, 2014 #2

    micromass

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    Are you suggesting that this isn't bad? (just asking cause it's not clear) Cause I consider this to be quite an awful statement.

    But anyway, Donald Sterling seems to be a despicable human being. But I also don't really understand why he was banned for life for a private conversation. I'm very happy that racism has become so unacceptable. But this seems more like thought police.
     
  4. May 1, 2014 #3
    There are certain realities when you run a business where 90% of your employees are of a certain race.

    I listened to audio and his comments were racist. He has a long history of it. That being said his predatory trophy GF is disgusting. He gets what he deserves on both ends.

    He signed a contact with the NBA which outlines such punishments. If nothing happened I guarantee there would have been a huge protest/walkout from players. It would have damaged the NBA greatly. They had to act fast and hard.
     
  5. May 1, 2014 #4

    micromass

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    Is there any chance of seeing the specific contract and specifically which of the points in the contract apply to his case?
     
  6. May 1, 2014 #5
    It would be nice if some news org would publish something. I'm not sure it's public information and if it were, it's likely a few hundred pages long :D
     
  7. May 1, 2014 #6
    I wonder if such standards are held to the players and any racist or misogynistic remarks they make in private? I doubt it.
     
  8. May 1, 2014 #7

    micromass

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    Too bad. I'm sure the NBA had enough legal grounds to fine him and to issue a lifetime ban, but I would have liked to see the specifics.

    Anyway, I'm not a fan of the media's involvement in things like this. It does seem like something that is overhyped. I obviously do not agree at all to what he said. But should there really be such a media outcry for something that people say in private conversations? In the meanwhile, 100 of female students in a school in Nigeria are kidnapped and forced to marry radical islamists, and nobody talks about that! Talk about priorities...
     
  9. May 1, 2014 #8
    I'm not suggesting this isn't bad. But the people or media reaction was way over. I agree with your points.

    Say if there are two day care in town. One of them has a man as a care taker; the other one is run by a woman. Assume all other variable are the same. If you are looking for a day care for your daughter, which one do you choose? If I prefer the woman running day care for the same reason, does that make me a sexist? Probably yes, in a stricter sense. But I think most humans are that way.
     
  10. May 1, 2014 #9

    nsaspook

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    Sound like a bad lovers spat of an old bigot, paid off wife and gold-digger girlfriend.

    The guy is 80, a billionaire and his estate could easily fight it in court until he's dead so the tax bite could be reduced as an inheritance. He bought the team for 12 million and could sell for 600 million today but lose almost half in taxes. The NBA had better get ready for a battle if they want to take his toy. As far as I can tell owners don't have a morals clause in the contact so if the team continues to make money they have no grounds to take it away from him unless he did something illegal. (Like maybe the person releasing the recording did.)
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2014
  11. May 1, 2014 #10

    russ_watters

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  12. May 1, 2014 #11

    russ_watters

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    Why should we not consider his entire history?

    I do find the hypocrisy part of the issue delicious though. The guy has money, so people have ignored his blatant racism for years, including Al Sharpton and the NCAA who knew he was a racist, but were set to give him an award anyway!
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2014
  13. May 1, 2014 #12

    russ_watters

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    He says he's going to fight it, but I don't get his angle. He's already lost: his money making potential is just going to go down from here. The NBA can probably destroy the franchise while he's fighting them and even if he successfully stops that, there is nothing he can do about his sponsors, fans, players, coaches and staff abandoning the team.
     
  14. May 1, 2014 #13

    nsaspook

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    http://blogs.findlaw.com/free_enter...for-biz-owners-how-to-vote-out-a-partner.html

    http://mediacentral.nba.com/media/mediacentral/NBA-Constitution-and-By-Laws.pdf
    Article 13:
     
  15. May 1, 2014 #14
    He wasn't banned though, at least not from what I could tell.

    With respect to the NBA,
    I find it hard to believe this is the first time somebody associated with the NBA has been caught making racist remarks. But I do believe this is the first time somebody has been banned for it. I wonder if they will stick to this new precedent and apply it evenly in the future. I don't think they will.
     
  16. May 1, 2014 #15

    WannabeNewton

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    In terms of content alone there's certainly no difference but he is representative of the NBA so if something has the potential to tarnish its image in the public, especially given the extreme over-hyped atmosphere the media painted the exchange in, then it's in its interest to take action so as to save face-in this case that entailed the banning of Sterling from the NBA. Clearly this is different from garden variety parents telling their kids racist things in their own home.

    The thought police is probably one of the most annoying abstract entities at power in this country. Regardless, he still wins in the end. He is being forced to sell his team and no doubt he'll make ALOT of money from the sale given how little he paid for the team when he originally got it.
     
  17. May 2, 2014 #16
    Will the fans boycott the games over this? Are the other owners of the teams willing to have any of their own behavior that might not be so lily white drawn out if it comes to an attempt to force him to sell? Will the NBA consider to vet any future owners, as is done for supreme court judges for image protection? Or will they just go on following the money? What about the players? Have they all been righteous upstanding citizens?
    It is all ludicrous. A month from now everyone will have forgotten this incident. The NBA reaction had best not inflame the situation.
     
  18. May 2, 2014 #17

    vela

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    I don't understand why the fact that he made these comments in private has any bearing on how the NBA reacted upon learning about them.


    Because when he bought the team, he agreed to abide by the league's rules.


    I think you mean the NAACP, specifically the Los Angeles chapter.
     
  19. May 2, 2014 #18

    vela

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    Sterling isn't just somebody; he is the owner of one of the teams. If in the future it's revealed another owner is a blatant racist like Sterling, I'd expect he or she would receive a lifetime ban as well.

    I'm guessing you're suggesting that if a player makes racist remarks, he likely won't be banned. That's true. Is it hypocritical? Maybe. But there's a significant difference between players and owners. The player isn't in a position of power like the owner is over his players and employees.
     
  20. May 2, 2014 #19
    Yes, the thought police are always getting those people who say and do things, aren't they?
     
  21. May 2, 2014 #20

    nsaspook

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    Being a blatant racist and acting blatantly racist in the operations of the team should be you banned and removed as a owner but I see nothing from anyone about how his views have effected his dealings with the team or league recently. It's only recently that the Clipper weren't the worst team in professional sports by a long shot. It's all about money and possible losses now that he has something others want. If the team was still crap this would be a nothing story like his previous racist actions were in the past.

    If racism is a disqualifying set of beliefs in the NBA what about rampant homophobia?
     
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