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Double Dispalcement Reactiosn

  1. Oct 18, 2005 #1
    I am having trouble with double displacement reactions. I know for some of them, no reactions will occur because the metal isn't strong enough to displace the other metal . I was wondering if any of you could clear this up.
    Do I see if the first metal can displace the second metal, or do i see if teh second metal can displace the first?

    --If you could answer me quickly, that would be awesome. :smile:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 18, 2005 #2
    Can someone please help me I have a test on this tomorrow!
     
  4. Oct 18, 2005 #3
    I am guessing what you are talking about is actually a single replacement reaction where one more reactivite metal displaces another metal in solution.

    The activity series is as follows:
    Lithium
    Potassium
    Barium
    Calcium
    Sodium
    Magnesium
    Aluminum
    Manganese
    Zinc
    Chromium
    Iron
    Cobalt
    Nickel
    Tin
    Lead
    Hydrogen (acids)
    Copper
    Silver
    Mercury
    Platinum
    Gold

    For example consider the reaction between copper and silver nitrate.
    Cu + 2AgNO3 --> Cu(NO3)2 + 2Ag

    This reaction occurs because copper is more reactive than the silver which is in solution as silver nitrate. The converse of that equation would not occur:

    Ag + Cu(NO3)2

    because silver is less reactive than copper.

    Anything above hydrogen on the reactivity scale will react with an acid. For example: zinc and hydrochloric acid

    Zn + 2HCl --> ZnCl2 + H2

    So basically look at the bare metal and see if it is higher up on the chart than the metal in the compound. If it is, then the reaciton will occur.

    A double displacement reaction deals with two ionic substances in solution and will occur with the formation of a precipitate or a gas.

    For example:
    Na2CO3 + CaCl2 --> 2NaCl + CaCO3(s)

    This reaction occurs because CaCO3 (calcium carbonate) is insoluble.

    Na2CO3 + 2HCl --> 2NaCl + H2CO3

    Carbonic acid is unstable: H2CO3 --> H2O + CO2(g)

    This reaction occurs because CO2 gas is formed.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2005
  5. Oct 18, 2005 #4
    Thank you so much
     
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