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Double slit experiment

  1. Dec 28, 2015 #1
    I know when they performed the famous double slits experiment they used either electrons, or photons.

    I am trying to find out what is the largest size we could use (proton, molecule, etc) where the probability of wave-particle duality to occur in the experiment drops to something negligible (maybe 10%).
    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 28, 2015 #2

    BvU

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    The probability is always there and is always 100%, but the characteristics become undetectable if the Broglie wavelength becomes too small.
    So the corny answer is that you could throw around whole planets and still have wave-particle duality.

    And we have to realize that finding a narrow slit for a big object to go through is kind of making this even harder !
     
  4. Dec 28, 2015 #3
    This experiment has been set up and reproduced in various guises many times and using various means.
    In 2006 the first such experiment was successfully performed (that is the experiment yielded results consistent with quantum effects) by Yves Couder and Emmanuel Fort (in France) on a macroscopic object, that of an oil droplet of some number of atoms.
    There is an upper, practical limit, however, due to the potential for an interaction occurring between the emission of the object and the detection on screen. This potential increases rapidly as the number of component parts (spatial volume they inhabit?) increases.
     
  5. Dec 28, 2015 #4
    I happened to have watch MIT OCW videos on QM. The Prof said that even bucky balls have been shown to show quantum characteristics. Pretty awesome!!
     
  6. Dec 28, 2015 #5

    DrChinese

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  7. Dec 28, 2015 #6

    DrClaude

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    The subsequent work of Markus Arndt and his group has been even more remarkable. They went to molecules of up to 810 atoms: http://arxiv.org/abs/1310.8343
     
  8. Dec 29, 2015 #7
    I thought I had read about something like that, but couldn't find the details!
    Thanks, really amazing.
     
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