Dropping Balls in tube with liquid

  • Thread starter bbq2014
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  • #26
haruspex
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I hand calculated the instantaneous velocities for these cases using finite differences (central difference approximation), and, in neither case did I obtain a velocity variation with time anything like what loggerpro gave you. After the initial transient, the velocities were nearly constant (of course, with some expected scatter). For the first case, I got a terminal velocity of about 0.4 m/s, and, in the second case, about 0.25 m/s.

Chet

But neither of those tables match the distance-time graph linked at post #14 (which, in my view, does match the velocity-time graph and data originally posted). So I don't think these are from the right trial.
 
  • #28
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Good point. So maybe bbq2014 can make that x-t data available to us?

Chet

Sorry I don't have the x-t table for the first graph, and i can't recreate the graph again since, i don't know how many fps i did when analysing it, so it would be different. Alternatively you could approximate the points. Sorry!
 
  • #29
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Try it with the data sets you sent me. Use a spreadsheet like excel. To get the velocity vs time plot, calculate v=(Xi+1 - Xi)/(Ti+1 - Ti) at t=(Ti+1 + Ti)/2 at each i , and plot the v's vs the x's. Compare what you get with what logger pro gave. Share with us the comparison.

Chet
 

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