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Drude model

  1. Nov 4, 2013 #1
    As far as I understand: In the Drude model we take the electron to be moving in a random direction after each collision (*), such that the mean velocity is simply the average of -eEt/m, which is just -eEτ/m, where τ is the relaxation time.
    But Im very confused about this basic assumption (*), if the electron has a velocity in the direction of the field and suffers collision with another electron, it does not seem likely that the direction of the velocity of the 2 electrons after collision will be completely random.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 4, 2013 #2

    UltrafastPED

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  4. Nov 5, 2013 #3
    That was quite helpful. Now I don't suppose you could help me interpreting another
    l) states that the equation for the displacement of a Fermi sphere is (all h's are hbars):
    h(d/dt + 1/τ)δk = F
    Now Newtons law for a completely free electron is:
    hdk/dt = F
    Why have they put in a δk, and how is the equation to be interpreted? Does it represent the motion of the Fermi sphere in steady state?
     
  5. Nov 5, 2013 #4

    UltrafastPED

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    Probably the variation of k ...

    You would get more attention by posting a new question.
     
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