1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Dual nature of light

  1. Aug 28, 2011 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data


    Light propagates as waves, but exchanges energy as particles
    2. Relevant equations

    I dont understand the second part, i.e., light exchanges energy as particle. I need the help of members in this regard

    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 28, 2011 #2
    light and every other elementary particle act as particle and as a wave it depends on how u look them.
     
  4. Aug 31, 2011 #3
    I dont understand sir
     
  5. Sep 1, 2011 #4
    It's very strange; I'd recommend looking up on YouTube or something similar the double slit experiment (both Young's and the one with buckyballs).


    In a very non-intuitive way, particles, or even you and I, act as waves. Depending on the circumstances, we exhibit wave or particle like properties.

    Don't worry though, you and I have an extremely tiny wavelength. :P
     
  6. Sep 1, 2011 #5

    PeterO

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    It could just be that light is neither a particle nor a wave but something mysterious, HOWEVER, in certain circumstances - like the Young's slit experiment, we can use wave properties to accurately predict/explain what is happening.
    In other cases, like the photo electric effect, we can only accurately predict/explain what is happening if we use a particle model.
    In other cases - like light bouncing off a mirror - either model will do, though you might be more satisfied with one compared to the other.
    Two beams of light passing straight through each other [at right angles] is more satisfyingly explained with the wave model.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Dual nature of light
  1. The Nature of Light (Replies: 1)

  2. The Nature of Light (Replies: 0)

  3. The nature of light (Replies: 1)

  4. Nature of light (Replies: 6)

  5. The nature of light (Replies: 1)

Loading...