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Duplex houses?

  1. Oct 24, 2010 #1
    Please help me

    There are two families that want to rent together in a house but they want to be almost separate
    Like a house for onw family and a unit for the other family separate in the same house.
    if i need to do research what is this kind of place called ? Please help me?

    Thank you to all of you
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 24, 2010 #2
    Re: Please help and post a comment

    What is a duplex house mean?

    If i need a house to rent but i also want another unit with to rent to somebody else what is called ?

    Thanks
     
  4. Oct 24, 2010 #3

    Evo

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    A duplex is two units (they're like two separate houses) joined by a common wall.
     
  5. Oct 25, 2010 #4
    Duplex means either a whole house on top of another house -- separate entrances, completely separate homes. Or, it means side-by-side houses that happen to be joined in the centre.
     
  6. Oct 25, 2010 #5

    Danger

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    What the family might be more inclined toward is what we refer to here as "basement suites". That's where the lower floor of a home is set up as a complete apartment but has access to the upper floors if the "airlock" door is left open. (Bad choice of words, but close to what I meant. There's a common entrance, which opens into a stairwell landing. Go downstairs to the basement suite, or upstairs to the main floor. Each has it's own lockable entry door.)
     
  7. Oct 25, 2010 #6

    Siv

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    Isn't that a row house ? Duplex apartments are 2-level apartments.
     
  8. Oct 25, 2010 #7

    Danger

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    The term "row house" doesn't exist in North America. Duplexes are two mirror-image houses that share a common wall. There is no connection between them as far as entrance goes.
    (They don't have to be mirror images, but that's the way that they're normally built.)
     
  9. Oct 25, 2010 #8

    Evo

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    No, here a duplex is side by side. I guess depending on the style oF homes in your area, the definition changes. There will be what appears to be a large one or 2 story home, split down the middle and both have their own front door.

    Edit: I see Danger already beat me to it!
     
  10. Oct 25, 2010 #9
    um.. yes, it does.. they are basically homes with 'common outer walls' .. example -> http://baltimorerehab.com/327_s_fulton/PICT0006.JPG

    example of a 'duplex' -> http://www.ar-cityliving.com/imgs/capitol/duplex.jpg [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  11. Oct 25, 2010 #10
    Britain:

    A single house, attached to no others = Detached
    Two houses, attached by a common wall = Semi-Detached
    Three or more houses attached in a row = Terrace

    Generally, if a building is split in two (vertically) it is considered to be split into flats.

    Just thought I'd throw this in.

    By the sounds of it you want what Danger suggested, a house with a self contained basement (or attic) flat.
     
  12. Oct 25, 2010 #11

    Evo

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  13. Oct 25, 2010 #12
    That would be a UK terrace, although I will say, ours have more character.

    PF-terrace-houses_1109768c.jpg
     
  14. Oct 25, 2010 #13

    Danger

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    I stand corrected as to the North American aspect. In Canada, those are still multiplexes with whatever prefix is applicable. Before my wife buggered off, we lived in one unit of a quadraplex, which everyone here calls a 4-plex. You Yanks have different terms for a lot of things. For instance, I still don't know what the hell a "brownstone" is. For some reason, it sounds both dirty and expensive at the same time.
     
  15. Oct 25, 2010 #14

    Siv

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    Wow, and here in India that definition would be very different :smile:
     
  16. Oct 26, 2010 #15
    Come to think of it, I've not heard the term "row house" used in Canada. We call them "townhouses" don't we?

    See, I first heard that term as a definition for that type of house when I moved to western Canada. In eastern Canada, and in the neighbourhoods I grew up in, we called houses like that a "double". Houses that were split horizontally with an up/down configuration with both homes being above ground and having separate entrances were called "duplexes".


    Those are gorgeous. I *wish* we had those here so attractively designed. We have them, they just generally don't look as nice and don't face a main road. They tend to be built in blobs of like-houses in a community of crescents and cul-de-sacs and confusing little streets and all match each other. They're called "townhouses" here. Terrace sounds much nicer.
     
  17. Oct 26, 2010 #16

    Evo

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    They're pretty much unheard of in the majority of the US.
    http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-row-houses.htm
     
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