E^y + e^-y =2x or e^2y - 2xe^y + 1 = 0 equation

  • #1
thenewbosco
187
0
In this textbook i am looking at it says:

"Thus e^y + e^-y =2x or

e^2y - 2xe^y + 1 = 0"

how did they go from the first to the second part?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Hurkyl
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
14,967
19
Well, look at pieces of the equation and see if that gives you any clues.

For example, their second equation has an e^(2y) in it1. Can you think of anything to do to the first equation so that the result will have an e^(2y) in it?

1: I assume you meant e^(2y) and not e^2y (which is the same as (e^2)y)
 
  • #3
Dr Avalanchez
18
0
You should really try to figure this out yourself. What's the difference between the two equations?
 
  • #4
thenewbosco
187
0
i still don't get how to go from

[tex]e^y + exp(-y)=2x[/tex]

to

[tex]e^2y - 2xe^y + 1 = 0[/tex]

help please
 
  • #5
asdf60
81
0
I'm not sure, but that y should be raised too...e^(2y) not (e^2)y
 
  • #6
Hurkyl
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
14,967
19
Have you tried any of our hints?
 

Suggested for: E^y + e^-y =2x or e^2y - 2xe^y + 1 = 0 equation

Replies
4
Views
333
Replies
2
Views
973
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
954
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
0
Views
399
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
339
Replies
4
Views
998
  • Last Post
Replies
16
Views
484
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
578
  • Last Post
Replies
18
Views
1K
Top