Easy one!

  • #1
Zhalfirin88
137
0
This isn't a homework question, but I thought it'd still be an appropriate place.

So this is about vector spaces. I know these are sort of abstract spaces but I'd like more explanation on them.

1) [tex] \mathbb{R} [/tex] This is the space of real vectors right, like from real numbers?

2) [tex] \mathbb{P} [/tex] What does this mean that it's a polynomial space? Like the standard basis is {1,t,t2,t3...} but how is [tex] \mathbb{P}_n[/tex] different from [tex] \mathbb{R}^n [/tex]

3) [tex] \mathbb{C} [/tex] My instructor basically showed us this one, but didn't explain it cause we don't use it in our linear algebra class.

Edit: Are there any other majors spaces that I didn't list but are important to know?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
36,653
8,652
This isn't a homework question, but I thought it'd still be an appropriate place.

So this is about vector spaces. I know these are sort of abstract spaces but I'd like more explanation on them.

1) [tex] \mathbb{R} [/tex] This is the space of real vectors right, like from real numbers?
Yes, pretty much. A vector in this space extends from the origin to a given real number. A vector space consists, naturally enough, of vectors, whose components come from some field. In this case, the field is the real numbers. Scalar multiplication means multiplication by real numbers.
2) [tex] \mathbb{P} [/tex] What does this mean that it's a polynomial space? Like the standard basis is {1,t,t2,t3...} but how is [tex] \mathbb{P}_n[/tex] different from [tex] \mathbb{R}^n [/tex]
Usually you'll see this as Pn, the (function) space of polynomials of degree <= n. A function space is structurally identical to a vector space, and must satisfy the same 10 axioms. Notice that a basis for Pn consists of n + 1 functions, while a basis for Rn consists of n vectors.
3) [tex] \mathbb{C} [/tex] My instructor basically showed us this one, but didn't explain it cause we don't use it in our linear algebra class.
This would be similar in some respects to the vector space R, but the field is the complex numbers. The components are complex numbers, and scalar multiplication is done using complex numbers.
Edit: Are there any other majors spaces that I didn't list but are important to know?
Matrices of a given size form a vector space. E.g., there's a vector space that consists of 2 x 2 matrices, another for 3 x 2 matrices, and so on. For more examples, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Examples_of_vector_spaces.
 
  • #3
Zhalfirin88
137
0
Thanks Mark. :)
 

Suggested for: Easy one!

Replies
28
Views
344
Replies
4
Views
340
Replies
8
Views
357
Replies
19
Views
713
Replies
8
Views
927
Replies
13
Views
750
Replies
8
Views
472
Replies
12
Views
570
  • Last Post
Replies
14
Views
1K
Top