Eaten too much chili

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  • #1
wolram
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My mouth is on fire as are my lips and belly, i should not have eaten the birds eyes raw, what is the antidote for chili over indulgence?
 

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  • #2
Astronuc
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My mouth is on fire as are my lips and belly, i should not have eaten the birds eyes raw, what is the antidote for chili over indulgence?
Hmmm. Yogurt and/or icecream should help you. Usually something with dairy fat helps dilute/dissolve the capsaicin. Butter would also help.
 
  • #3
Evo
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I like mixing sour cream into my chili.
 
  • #4
IMP
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Wait till you get the fire "downstairs" tomorrow...
 
  • #5
wolram
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I mixed birds eye chili with branston pickle, and had it with cheddar cheese, the cheese was smelly with the chrunchy bits, with onion bread it was to die for.
 
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rhody
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I mixed birds eye chili with branston pickle, and had it with cheddar cheese, the cheese was smelly with the chrunchy bits, with onion bread it was to die for.
Wolram,

In my exposure to hot (ghost) peppers they always show people cutting the heat with cold milk. Thats the best knowledge I have.

Rhody... :redface:
 
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Bread is the classic way to remove the sting from your mouth. Liquids just spread the oils around. For the stomach, antacids.
 
  • #8
Evo
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I mixed birds eye chili with branston pickle, and had it with cheddar cheese, the cheese was smelly with the chrunchy bits, with onion bread it was to die for.
Oh, you ate the peppers!!! AAAARRRGGH!
 
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Astronuc
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  • #10
drizzle
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I've noticed that indian restaurants serve sliced lemons as a side dish, to wash away the hotness of chili food... That's what I concluded after trying it. :biggrin:
 
  • #11
collinsmark
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I mixed birds eye chili with branston pickle, and had it with cheddar cheese, the cheese was smelly with the chrunchy bits, with onion bread it was to die for.
I used to put bird's eye chillies on frozen pizza; and occasionally I've eaten them raw when in the mood for a spicy zing. Someone I knew had a plant and grew them, so there was always ample supply. I remember a different friend of mine saw me eating one raw, so he did the same thinking it must not be a big deal. He still kids me about it to this day saying that I should have provided him with medical attention.

Take heed from this Sriracha Rooster Sauce cartoon for advice. I love rooster sauce too.

http://theoatmeal.com/comics/sriracha" [Broken]

"What you're feeling is premature enlightenment."
 
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  • #12
lisab
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Bread is the classic way to remove the sting from your mouth. Liquids just spread the oils around. For the stomach, antacids.
Especially bread with butter or olive oil.
 
  • #13
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Especially bread with butter or olive oil.

Yeah, anyone who actually eats a lot of hot food knows bread is the best choice.

Slices of lemon are there to keep the flies out of your drink. Its a tropical thing. You have to live in the tropics to truly appreciate just how bad bugs can get.
 
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  • #14
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here's what http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capsaisin#Food" says

Bathing the mucous membrane surfaces that have contacted capsaicin with oil is the most effective way to attenuate the associated discomfort. Since oil and capsaicin are both hydrophobic hydrocarbons the capsaicin which has not already been absorbed into tissues will be picked up into solution and easily removed. Water is almost completely ineffective. Cold milk is the second most effective solution against the burning sensation (due to caseins having a detergent effect on capsaicin) and cold sugar solution (10%) at 20 °C (68 °F) is almost as effective. The burning sensation will slowly fade away over several hours if no actions are taken. In some cases people enjoy the pain; there is a growing demand for capsaicin spiced food and beverages.
nothing about bread, but I guess bread is absorbent which is why it would work.
 
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  • #15
turbo
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here's what http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capsaisin#Food" says nothing about bread, but I guess bread is absorbent which is why it would work.
Bread is a good vehicle for getting butter or olive oil into the stomach. I wouldn't willingly eat a hunk of butter or slug down a shot or two of olive oil, but combined with some nice French bread, oh yeah!
 
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  • #16
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nothing about bread, but I guess bread is absorbent which is why it would work.

Cold sugar water or a mouth full of oil sound like desperation measures to me. Must have been suggested by some doctor.

Bread can be found on almost any restaurant table and in almost every home. Usually if you eat a little plain bread before the capsaicin has a change to spread around your mouth it prevents the worst symptoms by soaking up most of the excess. If necessary, slap a little butter or olive oil on it and wash it down with some milk.
 
  • #17
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I was at a thai place last night and I picked extreme hot spicy noodles. I didn't feel any pain or burns but all my face was sweating bad :rofl: Red wine and a napkin helped!

But, it's different in case of habaneros/habaneros sauce I have with me. My lips and hands burn if I am not careful but milk always helps!
 
  • #18
collinsmark
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Bread is a good vehicle for getting butter or olive oil into the stomach.
Now you're talkin'! http://www.websmileys.com/sm/happy/1470.gif
I wouldn't willingly eat a hunk of butter or slug down a shot or two of olive oil, but combined with some nice French bread, oh yeah!
Don't knock it 'till ya try it. :tongue2: (But yes, I understand that using a butter conduit [that's what I call a small piece of bread] is the socially acceptable method.)
 
  • #19
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iirc maltase is produced in a person's mouth, so the starch in bread would start to be broken down into sugars right away which could help with the spiciness. could that be the real reason, or is it still a stretch? :uhh:
 

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