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Eaten too much chili

  1. Sep 22, 2011 #1

    wolram

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    My mouth is on fire as are my lips and belly, i should not have eaten the birds eyes raw, what is the antidote for chili over indulgence?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 22, 2011 #2

    Astronuc

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    Hmmm. Yogurt and/or icecream should help you. Usually something with dairy fat helps dilute/dissolve the capsaicin. Butter would also help.
     
  4. Sep 22, 2011 #3

    Evo

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    I like mixing sour cream into my chili.
     
  5. Sep 22, 2011 #4

    IMP

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    Wait till you get the fire "downstairs" tomorrow...
     
  6. Sep 22, 2011 #5

    wolram

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    I mixed birds eye chili with branston pickle, and had it with cheddar cheese, the cheese was smelly with the chrunchy bits, with onion bread it was to die for.
     
  7. Sep 22, 2011 #6

    rhody

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    Wolram,

    In my exposure to hot (ghost) peppers they always show people cutting the heat with cold milk. Thats the best knowledge I have.

    Rhody... :redface:
     
  8. Sep 22, 2011 #7
    Bread is the classic way to remove the sting from your mouth. Liquids just spread the oils around. For the stomach, antacids.
     
  9. Sep 22, 2011 #8

    Evo

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    Oh, you ate the peppers!!! AAAARRRGGH!
     
  10. Sep 22, 2011 #9

    Astronuc

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    At first, I thought he meant Bird's Eye (brand) Chili, and I thought that shouldn't be that hot. But then I looked it up and found Bird's Eye chili(s).
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bird's_eye_chili
     
  11. Sep 22, 2011 #10

    drizzle

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    I've noticed that indian restaurants serve sliced lemons as a side dish, to wash away the hotness of chili food... That's what I concluded after trying it. :biggrin:
     
  12. Sep 22, 2011 #11

    collinsmark

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    I used to put bird's eye chillies on frozen pizza; and occasionally I've eaten them raw when in the mood for a spicy zing. Someone I knew had a plant and grew them, so there was always ample supply. I remember a different friend of mine saw me eating one raw, so he did the same thinking it must not be a big deal. He still kids me about it to this day saying that I should have provided him with medical attention.

    Take heed from this Sriracha Rooster Sauce cartoon for advice. I love rooster sauce too.

    http://theoatmeal.com/comics/sriracha" [Broken]

    "What you're feeling is premature enlightenment."
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  13. Sep 22, 2011 #12

    lisab

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    Especially bread with butter or olive oil.
     
  14. Sep 22, 2011 #13

    Yeah, anyone who actually eats a lot of hot food knows bread is the best choice.

    Slices of lemon are there to keep the flies out of your drink. Its a tropical thing. You have to live in the tropics to truly appreciate just how bad bugs can get.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2011
  15. Sep 22, 2011 #14
    here's what http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capsaisin#Food" says

    nothing about bread, but I guess bread is absorbent which is why it would work.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 26, 2017
  16. Sep 22, 2011 #15

    turbo

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    Bread is a good vehicle for getting butter or olive oil into the stomach. I wouldn't willingly eat a hunk of butter or slug down a shot or two of olive oil, but combined with some nice French bread, oh yeah!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 26, 2017
  17. Sep 22, 2011 #16

    Cold sugar water or a mouth full of oil sound like desperation measures to me. Must have been suggested by some doctor.

    Bread can be found on almost any restaurant table and in almost every home. Usually if you eat a little plain bread before the capsaicin has a change to spread around your mouth it prevents the worst symptoms by soaking up most of the excess. If necessary, slap a little butter or olive oil on it and wash it down with some milk.
     
  18. Sep 22, 2011 #17
    I was at a thai place last night and I picked extreme hot spicy noodles. I didn't feel any pain or burns but all my face was sweating bad :rofl: Red wine and a napkin helped!

    But, it's different in case of habaneros/habaneros sauce I have with me. My lips and hands burn if I am not careful but milk always helps!
     
  19. Sep 22, 2011 #18

    collinsmark

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    Now you're talkin'! http://www.websmileys.com/sm/happy/1470.gif
    Don't knock it 'till ya try it. :tongue2: (But yes, I understand that using a butter conduit [that's what I call a small piece of bread] is the socially acceptable method.)
     
  20. Sep 22, 2011 #19
    iirc maltase is produced in a person's mouth, so the starch in bread would start to be broken down into sugars right away which could help with the spiciness. could that be the real reason, or is it still a stretch? :uhh:
     
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