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Eating vegan.

  1. Dec 22, 2003 #1
    I'm not making this thread to start any sort of philisophical discussion about the rights of animals or anything, so please don't turn it into that.

    I was wondering if there's any real health advantage to eating vegan. Obviously too much fatty meat and other animal products isn't that good for you, but is cutting animal products out of your diet completely healthy, assuming you replace it with plant based proteins such as those found in soy, nuts and the like?
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2003
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  3. Dec 22, 2003 #2

    iansmith

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    No long term study that have been done on vegan versus vegetarian or order diet. Vegan do promote some healthy habits such as eat fruit and vegetable. Nuts and some fruit such as avocado do have fat, it is good fat but the effect of too much good fat is not that well study. In term of nutrient, the diet can full it up but there some nutrient that migth be more difficult to obtain from vegetal.

    There is many vegan at our univeristy department but most do not seen to be healthier than the average person. Some look a bit too thin in my opinion, it is as if they are starving but I bet they do not have many physical activities in their schedules. I have not seen many in intramurals sports or at the gym.
     
  4. Dec 23, 2003 #3
    I'm not sure I've read anything conclusive as to whether or not eating vegan is healthier than other diets or not. However, to get all of the proper nutrients and vitamins to maintain optimum health, I've heard that a person would need to be snacking pretty much constantly in addition to regular meals; unless they were taking suppliments. Which is something alot of vegans don't want to do, supposedly because vegan suppliments are hard to come by. Don't quote me on that one tho.

    From my experience ( I haven't been vegan but have been friends with many..), I've never met a vegan that didn't look slender, if not downright underweight.

    If one factors in things like bovine growth hormones in dairy and hormones and antibiotics in meats, then I can see how being vegan could potentially be safer. So long one manages to avoid the franken-soy, corn and tomato stuffs out there.
     
  5. Dec 23, 2003 #4
    There is no way to answer this question with the information given. People give a type of "diet" a name and ask if it is healthly or not.

    For example: If one were eating a vegan type diet, which was centered around sugar, would that be healthy. I think not.

    Instead of using a fancy name, why not post your typical diet or the typical diet you are contemplating. Starting with breakfast and naming each meal along the way. Then list your exercise habits. At that time I can look at your diet and exercise and deteremine whether that is healthy or not.

    Nautica
     
  6. Dec 23, 2003 #5
    I'm not vegan and have no plans on becoming vegan, I'm merely curious.

    I'm not sure an exact diet to ask about, but I want to know if there's anything that simply can't be found in plant products, like a certain protein found only in meat that is nessicary for your cell membranes to stay at their optimum level of selective permeability.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2003
  7. Dec 23, 2003 #6

    Monique

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    Cholesterol maybe?
     
  8. Dec 23, 2003 #7
    I am almost certain that a vegan diet could be healthly. Proteins could come from soy products, Omega 3's could come from flaxseed oils and olive oils, and of course vitamins would not be a problem.

    It, also, depends on the persons life style. I enjoy lifting weights and do not feel that I could ever get enough protein without meat. But for others, 200 - 300 grams of protein per day is not neccesary.

    Nautica
     
  9. Dec 23, 2003 #8

    Monique

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    I was amazed by the loads of meat an 'American' eats on a day, especially in restaurants
     
  10. Dec 23, 2003 #9
    Forgive me, but, what does it mean to eat "vegan"? Does that mean no meat at all?
     
  11. Dec 23, 2003 #10
    No meat, no animal products, no firs, no leather, ect.........

    Nautica
     
  12. Dec 23, 2003 #11

    Monique

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    no animal products at all. No eggs, I guess no pies either since there is whipped cream or gelatine inside.
     
  13. Dec 23, 2003 #12

    iansmith

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    No animal product at all. No milk, yogurt, cheeze, egg, butter or anything that has animal fat as an ingredient or animal by-product.

    I know meat can give some creatine and iron in a concentration that are not found in plants.
     
  14. Dec 23, 2003 #13
    Keep in mind that one can eat meat and eat healthy. Example: chicken, salmon, tuna, turkey, lean red meat, ect....

    Nautica
     
  15. Dec 23, 2003 #14

    Monique

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    I don't think a pound of rare steak fits in there..
     
  16. Dec 23, 2003 #15
    Maybe, not but it sure does sound good. And a person can actually, stay quite lean and eat that amount.

    Nautica
     
  17. Dec 23, 2003 #16
    That’s interesting, about 8 months ago, we had something like a quiz from plant physiology, and one of the questions was is there cholesterol in plant cell membranes, there are some sterols but for cholesterol I’ve guessed no. And I was wrong by assistant of the professor, but again another ass. Prof. sad to me that there are no ch. in the membranes, bottom line was as I remember you can find cholesterol in some plants but not in the membrane.
     
  18. Dec 23, 2003 #17
    Vitamin B12 is essential and a vegan or vegetarian cannot get adequate amounts of this without supplimentation.

    The part I'm not sure about is whether or not suppliments of this can be made w/o using animal products. I think it's found only in meat...
     
  19. Dec 23, 2003 #18

    Monique

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    The plant equivalent of cholesterol is ergosterol. Its structure is slightly different, I am not sure if we can use it.. wait, what am I saying? That was yeasts.. never mind!

    *starts googling*
     
  20. Dec 23, 2003 #19

    Monique

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    Plants don't have cholesterol (no ergosterol either) but contain the equivalent sterols and stanols. Maybe we can incorporate those into our membranes without loss of function, I am not sure.
     
  21. Dec 23, 2003 #20
    Cholesterol in a Vegetarian Diet
    Blood Cholesterol and Dietary Cholesterol
    The word 'cholesterol' can refer to either 'blood-cholesterol' (the sort the body manufactures in the liver), or 'dietary-cholesterol' (the sort we ingest from food). Dietary cholesterol is obtained exclusively from animal sources (eg. meat, egg yolks, dairy etc) and is absent in plants.

    High Blood Cholesterol Related to Heart Disease
    Whether vegetarian or meat-eater, a person's blood-cholesterol levels are closely related to the risk of heart disease. The lower the cholesterol level the less chance of heart attack or stroke.

    Saturated Fat Ups Blood Cholesterol in Vegetarians & Meat Eaters
    Nutritionists and dietitians used to think that a person's intake of dietary-cholesterol affected blood-cholesterol levels, but now things are less clear. It appears that saturated fat-intake rather than dietary-cholesterol-intake is more closely related to raised blood-cholesterol levels. In other words, the higher your intake of saturated fat, the higher your blood-cholesterol levels.

    Saturated Fat in Vegan Diet
    As a vegan diet contains neither meat nor dairy fats, it is typically lower in saturated fat, which perhaps explains the low levels of coronary heart disease in vegans.

    Saturated Fat in Ovo-Lacto Vegetarian Diet
    The ovo-lacto vegetarian diet is typically higher in saturated fat than vegan diets but much lower than meat-diets. And ovo-lacto vegetarians too have greatly reduced levels of heart disease. Nonetheless, ovo-lacto vegetarians need to beware their intake of dairy products as well as their consumption of margarine and other processed food that may be high in hydrogenated fats (Trans-Fats) which are saturated.

    Heart Disease and Ovo-Lacto Vegetarians - Bottom Line
    A heart-healthy ovo-lacto vegetarian diet should contain a maximum of 30 percent calories in the form of fat, of which no more than one third (10 percent of total fat) should be saturated

    http://www.vegetarian-diet.info/cholesterol-vegetarian-diet.htm

    Nautica
     
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