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Education and relationships?

  1. Oct 24, 2009 #1
    ive noticed that education of guys who i want to date is the first thing that i usually notice about them. so how about you people? do you consider education of your partner as an factor or you are one of those people who even dont know whatever their partner is studying or what his work is .
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 24, 2009 #2
    ya u may b right.....but education of the partner is not a big issue..............
     
  4. Oct 24, 2009 #3
    I'm more concerned with intelligence than education. I used to hang out with my friend at the pub on his college campus and found that many a college girl are just as ditzy and/or superficial as the random women I meet at regular bars, they just talk a lot more about classes and professors.
     
  5. Oct 24, 2009 #4

    Pengwuino

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    Considering I study and work at my university, every person I seem to meet these days are in college/college graduates so it's not much of an issue. As SA said though, intelligence is important though and is not necessarily reflected in education. It seems that filtering people simply by having a degree doesn't really work as much of a filter these days.
     
  6. Oct 24, 2009 #5

    BobG

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    Yes, education and profession is a factor.

    A person that has a life, some intelligence, and is able to accomplish goals in their life is more pleasant to hang around than a person that finds satisfaction watching 12 hours straight of "Rosanne" reruns.

    You also don't like to have to ask whether a person is dating you because they like you or because you're the only way a high school dropout working at MacDonalds will ever visit Paris.
     
  7. Oct 24, 2009 #6
    Intelligence matters to me a lot more than education. I've met a lot of educated idiots. Just because you know math, doesn't mean you're smart. You can teach monkeys math. Probably.
     
  8. Oct 24, 2009 #7

    Astronuc

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    I was serious about a woman, but things started to fall apart when I made a comment about Relativity, and she had no idea what I was talking about. I mentioned Einstein's name, and she didn't recognize the name or the significance. At that point, I knew that the relationship was going to be limited.
     
  9. Oct 24, 2009 #8
    Education is a pretty big thing for me. If a girl tells me shes getting or has a degree in something like human resources or political science, I immediately lose all interest.
     
  10. Oct 24, 2009 #9

    cristo

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    Why? If one of your criteria is that a potential partner must have a degree in maths/physics, then you're seriously reducing your chances of finding a partner!
     
  11. Oct 24, 2009 #10

    BobG

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    You only need to find one, so why settle?

    I want a woman that's hot in the shop; one that can build a computer from the hairpins in her purse and program in C+++; a woman that can speak ten languages, do super string theory, and do landscape (or at least mow the yard and rake the leaves); a woman that can fly a space shuttle, has a black belt in karate, and likes it when the toilet seat is left up!
     
  12. Oct 24, 2009 #11
    Sounds like you're looking for a man.
     
  13. Oct 24, 2009 #12

    russ_watters

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    How do you notice education first? Are these guys wearing signs?

    Anyway, yes, I consider intellect, education (not exactly the same thing) and career to be very important reflections on a person's character.
     
  14. Oct 24, 2009 #13

    russ_watters

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    I suspect that Topher considers those useless degrees.

    I am of the perception that there are still an awful lot of people - and a lot more girls than guys - who go to college because it's the thing to do, an excuse to party or a way to meet a spouse.....and they think little about what they are studying while there. I am also of the perception you will find a significant fraction of people in those two majors who fall into those categories.

    There is also a group of people who want to find a career but just don't know what to do. That's moderately better, but the end result is not much different.
     
  15. Oct 24, 2009 #14

    George Jones

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    If you throw in engineering, my wife has three of 'em, two in physics and one in engineering.
     
  16. Oct 24, 2009 #15

    cristo

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    That's a rather broad generalisation-- I wouldn't think of a degree in political science as being particularly easy!

    What's wrong with that? I entered university not having a clue what career I wanted to do and, to be honest, I still don't. It's not bad to not know what you want to do with your life at the age of 18. Of course, if you enter into a degree programme like law, medicine, engineering.. which are pretty much vocational, you have essentially picked your career, but there are many degrees where that is not the case!

    Lol, well there are always exceptions!
     
  17. Oct 24, 2009 #16

    russ_watters

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    I went to the Naval Academy. Everyone who graduates chooses from the same pool of available jobs - major is not a constraint, only GPA is. Ie, depending on how many people want to be pilots and how many available slots there are, there may be some competition (there are also physical constraints on pilots and a flight aptitude exam). So some people choose easy majors because the college part of the Naval Academy isn't what's important to them.

    There is a saying at the Naval Academy: "poly sci and fly!"
    "Entered" is fine. But I have a friend who is 36 and still lives with his parents because he didn't figure it out while in college (and still really hasn't). On the other hand, my sister didn't know either and forced to choose at the last minute made a good decision, stuck with it and now has an excellent career. The point is, people need to make a decision in college that helps them get a viable career.
     
  18. Oct 24, 2009 #17

    Moonbear

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    I think it's pretty balanced between the sexes in terms of those who are attending college just because it's the thing to do to avoid having to get a job. Though, the ways they occupy their time instead of studying differs a bit. I've never met a guy who missed half a class because he was late returning from an appointment to pick out bridesmaid dresses. :rolleyes: Usually the guys miss because they're too hungover from the party the night before and oversleep well past noon.

    I don't set any specific criteria about education of the people I date, but I think it is an unconscious influence on my choices. Though, it's true, it's not just the degree obtained, but how much intelligence goes along with it. I meet an awful lot of educated men who are still dumb as posts, or have far too narrow of a focus to their interests that conversation gets boring when it's always about the same thing. The things I do look for in men tend to correlate pretty strongly to educational level, even if it's not a result of that education. For example, their motivation and drive to get things done, ability to hold their own in a duel of words, understanding why someone might work on weekends and evenings on a regular basis, ability to remain employed (though, I do contemplate that it might not be all bad to have someone who stayed home all day and took care of the house while I went to work...as long as he actually got the work around the house done and didn't spend the day sitting around in the garage with his buddies drinking beer and watching sports while having burping contests), the sense to know when it's time to goof around and play, and when it's time to be serious and put on the suit and tie without whining, etc.
     
  19. Oct 24, 2009 #18
    Yeah, pretty much. If I'm going to be in a serious relationship I want it to be with someone who has similar or values in goals in life that I do. One of those values is to actually accomplish something in my lifetime and not just live the depressing cookie cutter kind of life that most people do.

    I couldn't imagine being in a happy relationship with someone who is perfectly content with no goals except for collecting a pay check and getting smashed every weekend.
     
  20. Oct 24, 2009 #19

    cristo

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    I think you should stop being so judgemental. I know a couple of people with degrees in political science, or some variant, that have very well paid jobs. Just because one doesn't study a hard science doesn't make their education worthless.

    Also, isn't a "cookie cutter" either used to describe people who are incredibly privileged and living off their family's wealth, or to describe stay-home parents who look after their children full time? Either way, why is that a depressing life?
     
  21. Oct 24, 2009 #20
    You're still not getting what I'm saying. If someone pursues a specific career mainly for the monetary benefits or status, then they have very separate values from mine. Thats all fine, but I'll never have a committed relationship with anyone that has such mindset. I don't care how much their education is worth, I care about WHY they have it and HOW they use it.
    I meant "cookie cutter" as a figure of speech basically saying "all the same". I find the typical, "grow up, get a 9 to 5, have babies, retire, and die" kind of approach to life depressing because it makes living seem so pointless and inane.

    I once asked a x-gf (who was christian) why she wanted to live this kind of classical American dream. She told me it was because that's what god wanted her to do. You can probably figure out how that story ended.
     
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