Edwards will one day be president

  • #26
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Outcast said:
Why did 9-11 happen? Again lawyers. The terrorist at Logan Airport set off plenty of alarms that something was wrong, but nobody wanted to stop them for fear of another lawsuit by the ACLU for racial profiling.
OK, you're either completely insane or listen to way too much Rush Limbaugh.
 
  • #27
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Rush is nothing more than a Bush lap dog.

Sometimes I wish I was completely insane. Then I could get me a nice "I love me jacket", a padded cell, some good drugs and have nothing to worry about. Maybe someday government health benefits will cover reeducation camps for people that don't trust the government.

wasteofo2 said:
OK, you're either completely insane or listen to way too much Rush Limbaugh.
As the 9-11 hijackers passed through the security checkpoints at Logan, the airlines’ Computer-Assisted Passenger Profiling System, or CAPPS, actually singled out six of them for extra baggage screening because they had purchased one-way tickets with cash – two criteria that triggered red flags in the CAPPS system.

In conjunction with the Washington-based Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), the ACLU has lobbied hard against Arab-profiling at airports for years. “Profiles are notoriously under-inclusive,” says ACLU legislative counsel Gregory Nojeim. “Who knows who the next terrorist will appear as? It could be a grandmother. It could be a student. We just don’t know.” In their crusade to ban profiling, the ACLU and CAIR have enlisted the support of Democratic lawmakers like David Bonior, who represents a heavily Arab district in Michigan – and who, in turn, has lobbied FAA Administrator Jane Garvey.

The airline industry’s fear of such lawsuits is based on solid historical precedent. In 1993, for instance, the ACLU joined forces with the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee (ADC) to sue Pan American World Airways for having detained a man of Iranian descent during the first Persian Gulf War.

In 1999, the federal government pressured Argenbright Security Inc., the nation’s largest airport security firm, to rehire seven Arab workers it had recently fired. All seven were female non-citizens hailing from Sudan, Egypt, and Afghanistan. In the wake of the 1998 US embassy bombings in Africa, United had received numerous complaints from passengers nervous about Middle Eastern Muslims overseeing airport security. The women were fired for refusing to remove their headscarves – the wearing of which they said was required by the Koran – while screening passengers. In response, they filed a religion-bias complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Representative David Bonior joined their cause, piously lecturing Americans about “widespread and systematic discrimination against Muslims and Arab-Americans in airports all across the country.”

In June 2002 the ACLU filed lawsuits on behalf of five men of Middle Eastern and Asian extraction – each of whom had been escorted off their scheduled flights by airline security agents between October and December 2001.

From 9-11 to the present day, the ACLU has vigorously opposed every governmental attempt to more effectively protect the American people’s security. It sued, for example, to prevent the implementation of the Aviation and Transportation Security Act, which was passed in November 2001 and included a citizenship requirement for airport screeners. It organized protests against a “discriminatory” Justice Department and INS registration system requiring male “temporary visitors” to the US from 25 Arab and Muslim nations to register with the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services. It condemned the FBI’s “discriminatory” plan to count and document every mosque in the US. It protested when FBI and Homeland Security agents recently tried to track down illegal Iraqi immigrants they deemed dangerous. In Illinois, the ACLU actually set up a hotline designed to give free legal advice to undocumented Iraqis facing deportation. Former ACLU Executive Director Ira Glasser casually dismissed Americans’ concerns about illegal immigration, chalking such sentiments up to a “wave of anti-immigrant hysteria.”

On August 29, 2001, for instance, an FBI investigator in New York desperately pleaded for permission to initiate an intensive manhunt for al-Qaeda operative Khalid Almihdar, who was known to be planning something big. The Justice Department and the FBI deputy general counsel’s office both denied the request, explaining that because the evidence linking Almihdar to terrorism had been obtained through intelligence channels, it could not legally be used to justify or aid an FBI agent’s criminal investigation; in short, it would constitute a violation of Almihdar’s “civil rights.” “Someday, someone will die,” the agent wrote to his FBI superiors, “and the public will not understand why we were not more effective and throwing every resource we had at certain problems.” Thirteen days later, Almihdar took over the cockpit of American Airlines Flight 77 and crashed it into the Pentagon.
http://www.frontpagemag.com/Articles/ReadArticle.asp?ID=10209
 
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