EECS Major at UC Berkeley: Options and Career Prospects

In summary, there are five options for an EECS major at UC Berkeley: Electronics, Communications, Networks, and Systems, Computer Systems, Computer Science, and General. Electronics covers integrated circuits, fabrication technology, and other related topics. Communications, Networks, and Systems covers networks, control, and other topics related to biology or medicine. Computer Systems covers machine architecture, programming, and digital devices. Computer Science covers algorithms, complexity theory, and artificial intelligence. The General option allows for exploration of various areas in EECS. Communications may lead to higher paying jobs, but additional skills can be picked up regardless of the chosen option.
  • #1
Jables
2
0
Hi

I'm transfering to UC Berkeley as an EECS (EE & CS) major and I have to decide on an option soon. They are...

1) Electronics
2) Communications, Networks, Systems
3) Computer Systems
4) Computer Science <--- not an option, only for CSE majors
5) General

I'm leaning towards 1 & 2 (in no particular order), they all look interesting and stimulating so I'm having trouble choosing one. Is there anything I should know about career-wise? job prospects?

better descriptions are given below


Options

Electronics (Option I) is for students interested in integrated circuits, including fabrication technology, solid state devices, digital and analog circuits analysis and design, VLSI design, and computer-aided design and manufacturing; and for students interested in microelectromechanical systems, electromagnetics, acoustics, optoelectronics, plasmas, cryoelectronics, and antennas and propagation.

Communication, Networks, and Systems (Option II) is for students interested in networks, control, robotics, digital and analog communications, computer networks, signal processing, systems design and optimization, and power systems planning and operation; and for students interested in biology or medicine as well as electrical engineering, including biological sensors and signals, signal and image processing, and analysis and modeling of biological systems.

Computer Systems (Option III) is for students interested in machine architecture and logical design, operating systems, database systems, programming systems and languages, and digital devices and circuits.

Computer Science (Option IV) is for students interested in design and analysis of algorithms, complexity theory and other theoretical topics, artificial intelligence, and computer graphics.

General Option (Option V) is for students whose interests are broad or are not yet focused on a specific field. This flexible option enables students to explore several areas of electrical engineering and computer sciences.
 
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  • #2
The broadest option is plain ol' electronics. You'll learn skills which are applicable anywhere, in any industry. You won't, however, learn much about computers, which are also in every industry these days. If you do a computer systems option, you'll likely skip some of the specialized EE courses like fields and power, and take some programming classes instead. A computer engineer is also valuable to just about every industry.

Communications is the narrowest of the three options you presented -- you'll likely get a job with a communications equipment manufacturer. If you really like communications, go for it -- but it will limit job opportunities (slightly) compared to the other two options.

Of course, you can always take a few extra classes to round out your knowledge, regardless of the option you choose, and get the best of both (or all three) worlds.

- Warren
 
  • #3
Thanks a lot for your help chroot!

Maybe I'll do option 1 and take some of the communications classes as electives. I've heard that you can make the most money in communications and that's why most of the undergrads end up doing option 2. Do you know if that's true?

I see in your profile that your an EE grad student in the Bay Area, do you go to Berkeley?
 
  • #4
Nope, I attend SCU. It may be true that comm EE make the most money, but in my experience, your school training alone will only take you so far -- an EE with one concentration can pick up additional skills very quickly. For example, I actually hold a bachelor's of computer engineering, but I work for a high-speed analog company doing almost entirely EE work. Go figure!

- Warren
 

Related to EECS Major at UC Berkeley: Options and Career Prospects

What is the EECS major at UC Berkeley?

The EECS (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science) major at UC Berkeley is an interdisciplinary program that combines the fields of electrical engineering and computer science. It offers a rigorous curriculum that prepares students for careers in a wide range of industries, including technology, telecommunications, and manufacturing.

What are the options within the EECS major at UC Berkeley?

The EECS major at UC Berkeley offers three different options: Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, and Computer Engineering. Each option has its own specific curriculum and requirements, but all share a strong foundation in math, physics, and computer science.

What are the career prospects for EECS majors at UC Berkeley?

The career prospects for EECS majors at UC Berkeley are excellent. Graduates from this program are highly sought after by top companies in the technology industry, as well as in other fields such as finance, consulting, and healthcare. Many graduates also go on to pursue advanced degrees in engineering or computer science.

What makes the EECS major at UC Berkeley unique?

The EECS major at UC Berkeley is unique because of its strong emphasis on both theoretical and practical aspects of engineering and computer science. Students are exposed to cutting-edge research and have access to state-of-the-art facilities, as well as opportunities for hands-on learning through internships and projects.

Are there any resources available to help EECS majors at UC Berkeley with their career development?

Yes, UC Berkeley offers a variety of resources to help EECS majors with their career development. This includes career fairs, networking events, workshops, and career counseling services. The EECS department also has close ties with industry partners, providing students with valuable connections and opportunities for internships and jobs.

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