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EET vs. EE

  1. May 17, 2007 #1
    ...I just wanna know. is it possible for me to even get a job as some sort of engineering position outside of the South? Don't get me wrong I like georgia ok. and I love north carolina to death but y'know change needs to come. Everybody keeps telling me that having an eet degree won't hinder me much but I"m starting to think that's crap and employers only want 'real' engineering students. I mean here in ga. EET degree holders can take the FET. but I think georgia is the only state you can do that in. I'm graduating next may and I'm trying to do everything to augment my EET degree, I took calc 3 even though it wasn't required and I have a minor in computer science. I'm a double major but my other major is entirely unrelated (graphic design) so I don't think it'll do me much good. I'm just worried that I'm going to have to live the rest of my life in my home region until I can get a real engineering degree which I do want, I'm thinking one day of going back for mechanical since I'm starting to love it. but rite now like many senior eet students I'm just needing a break from school and some real life work. I'm looking project design, circuit design, design engineering, etc. since that was my strongest point in school.

    enough with the blabbering, so what can you tell me? Do I have a chance at a top industry design engineering job. Or am I doomed to live in georgia in some factory till i can a BS in ME?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 17, 2007 #2

    chroot

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    Almost no one gets hired into design jobs immediately after undergraduate school. You'll have to work a few years to get into any position of serious responsibility at any major company. Your EET degree will be a handicap compared to other students with full-fledged engineering degrees, but you might be able to catch up and be doing similar kinds of work after, say, five years of experience in other positions.

    - Warren
     
  4. May 18, 2007 #3
    Thanks for that, I know my EET degree is going to be a handicap but it's nice to know I've got a chance.
     
  5. May 18, 2007 #4

    chroot

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    You have a chance. There are brilliant engineers who got their only formal training from the Navy. There are brilliant engineers who never attended university at all, but worked their butts off through a long chain of promotions to finally become rather powerful people.

    Work ethic and determination are, on the whole, probably more important than education.

    - Warren
     
  6. May 18, 2007 #5
    I have been an ET/EET for the last 10 years, from my experience - it depends on the company. I have worked in NY and currently PA, the jobs I have held range from Security (First, and best), Telecom and Lighting Controls.

    Salary, I have never had a reason to complain, but if you are truly into design consider getting your MSEE. Lastly, realize that good Engineers/Technicians rarely stay in the "engineering roles" we imagined when we choose and started our careers.
     
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