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Effective Deflection of a beam

  1. Jul 12, 2016 #1
    I have a plate of 600mmX92mmx2mm. All the four sides are fixed.How can I calculate the effective deflection at the center due to self weight considering the deflection in longitudinal and transverse direction?
    Density of material 1170kg/m3
    Modulus of elasticity 2.5GPa
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 12, 2016
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  3. Jul 12, 2016 #2

    Nidum

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    Engineers quick solution - deflection will probably be very little .

    Otherwise just search on ' deflection of a rectangular plate ' to find the standard analytic solution .

    Come back if you have any problems .
     
  4. Jul 12, 2016 #3

    Nidum

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    That combination of material properties suggests that you are using some lightweight material such as plastic sheet .

    If you are then be aware that your calculated value for deflection may not be very accurate . Order of magnitude will probably be ok but don't rely on the exact figure .
     
  5. Jul 12, 2016 #4
    Thank you Nidium... Yea I am using some kind of POM. Just like a diffuser...If I calculate the deflection 2 dimensional then the longitudinal deflection comes around 10mm and in transverse direction its around .005mm. But in actual condition the sum effect of longitudinal and transverse deflection determines the scenario and I just wanted to know how to calculate the same. May be the order of magnitude will be enough.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2016
  6. Jul 12, 2016 #5

    Nidum

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    PF Plastic plate v1.png
     
  7. Jul 12, 2016 #6

    Nidum

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    ABS . Gravity load only .
     
  8. Jul 12, 2016 #7
    Thats awesome!!!!Thank you so much for the help. I believe the magnitude is in mm...
     
  9. Jul 12, 2016 #8

    Nidum

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    Yes mm . So deflection is very small .

    Very easy to alter the model if you want to try another load case .
     
  10. Jul 12, 2016 #9
    Thank you so much Nidum...Your help is much appreciated... :smile::smile::smile:
     
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