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Einstein's General and Special Theory of Relativity

  1. Apr 30, 2003 #1
    i have a few questions about both of these theorys that Einstein wrote.

    1. Was one of these theorys tested against 2 atomic clocks, one which is on earth and the other on a fast jet going around the earth, both clocks syncronised and the results were different, which theory was tested with this?

    2. E=MC2 vs E=MC3. would the laws of physics change if we had a formula E=MC3?.Would E=MC3not work due to that the tests of this formula would not be proved properly? Am i talking Theorectial Physics here lol?

    3. I am aware that there are other formulas other than Einsteins one, i was thinking are all the laws of physics based on Einsteins Special and General Theory of Relativity? because the laws would have to have a base of some sort? do we base these laws from einsteins theorys to come up with new formulas to work out specific solutions to problems involving physics?
     
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  3. Apr 30, 2003 #2

    pmb

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    re - "1. Was one of these theorys tested against 2 atomic clocks, one which is on earth and the other on a fast jet going around the earth, both clocks syncronised and the results were different, which theory was tested with this?"

    Yes.

    re - "E=MC2 vs E=MC3. would the laws of physics change if we had a formula E=MC3?.Would E=MC3not work due to that the tests of this formula would not be proved properly? Am i talking Theorectial Physics here lol?"

    I don't know. That's like asking what President Bush's personality would be like if he was someone else. However E = mc^3 does not have the dimensions of energy. It has the dimensionf of Energy*speed

    re - "3. I am aware that there are other formulas other than Einsteins one, i was thinking are all the laws of physics based on Einsteins Special and General Theory of Relativity?"

    No. Relativity makes statements about what the laws of nature are like. But only in that sense are they based on relativity. I.e. Relativity says the the laws of physics are the same in all coordinate systems.

    Laws are based on observation.


    Pmb
     
  4. Apr 30, 2003 #3

    Integral

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    The only thing that we can observe is how the universe changes. In terms of mathematics this is differentials. We are able to express the changes we observe in the universe as mathematical differentials. Thus we create a differential equation which models the changes of the universe. It seems that solutions of these differential equations are accurate reflections of actual events. Thus we are able to make predictions based on solutions of differential equations. For example.

    We have observed that the acceleration due to gravity is a constant, thus a falling body experences a constant acceleration. Mathematically we say x'' = -g . Where x'' is the second deriviative of x with respect to time. Solution of this differential equation is

    x = -(gt^2)/2 + V0t + x0

    the equation of motion for a falling body.
     
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