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El Meowmix Bandito

  1. Dec 1, 2005 #1
    I caught a nocturnal sneak thief getting into the food I leave out for the stray kitties last night:

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    I don't think you can tell from these dim shots, but this guy was huge.

    I made him nervous as I crept a little closer with the camera at one point and he started to go away. On impulse I said aloud "No, no, it's OK. You can eat the cat food. I just want to take your picture." As if he understood, or at least understood the tone of voice, he came back and continued eating.

    The other thing that was funny is that he picked the food out of the dish with his little hands and put it in his mouth.
    Between their manual dexterity and intelligence, I think these guys are on a par with monkeys. They sure seem alot brighter than possums.

    Possum Cat-Food Thief from a couple months ago:

    [​IMG]

    (See this thread for Math Is Hard's adventures with the racoon: https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=96658&highlight=Rocky)
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2005
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 1, 2005 #2

    Math Is Hard

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    Cool, Zoob! Too bad we can't see his little raccoon hards.
    And you know I love the possum picture. Little possum feetsies always trip me out, cause they look like little handsies.
     
  4. Dec 1, 2005 #3

    Math Is Hard

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    oh, and I googled "raccoon intelligence" and I came across this;
    http://www.ofnc.ca/fletcher/alphabet/raccoon.php
    so I guess they are pretty smart critters. Or cats are just lazy.
     
  5. Dec 1, 2005 #4

    Danger

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    Plural? What kind of critters do you think they are? :bugeye:

    Cats know how to do everything. They're just smart enough to wait and make someone else do it for them.
     
  6. Dec 1, 2005 #5

    Math Is Hard

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    oh dear. :redface: It's not me - it's the damned scratched cornea. I couldn't see what I was typing.:redface: :biggrin:
    How true. Someone once said that if dogs could talk, they would call you master. If cats could talk, they'd call you by your first name.
     
  7. Dec 1, 2005 #6

    Evo

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    RAUL!!!!!! :cry:

    I have another Possum!!!! Son of Raul. :approve: I couldn't even get back into my house for 30 minutes the other night. I was outside talking to the child of Evo and when I tried to get back into the house I had a possum sitting in front of my door. I scared it so it instantly froze and wouldn't move for 30 minutes. I had to go hide so it would relax and move away.

    Hey, we don't know how smart possums are because it's impossible to test them because they freeze up. :frown:
     
  8. Dec 1, 2005 #7
    Yeah, they prolly have super I.Q.'s. They just don't test well.
     
  9. Dec 1, 2005 #8

    Ivan Seeking

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    :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

    A dog can love anyone. A cat's love must be earned.
     
  10. Dec 1, 2005 #9

    Danger

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    If Lucy could talk, she'd call me 'Waiter'. :grumpy:
     
  11. Dec 1, 2005 #10
    Zoob, your critters have such good manners! I almost expected to see little napkins next to the food bowl!
     
  12. Dec 1, 2005 #11
    I remember when we first moved into our house, we'd rescue a stray cat once every christmas. They'd come to our house at the same time every night, and every night we'd bring a bowl of warm milk closer to the house.

    The nicest of the cats even came in the house, got to know our other cats, and would snuggle up next to us.
     
  13. Dec 1, 2005 #12

    Moonbear

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    And apparently, they're all smarter than Dr. Michel who just kept trying to train cats long enough to find out it took 7000 trials before they decided to stop toying with him and just do the stupid trick so they could be done with it (they really learned it on the 5th try, but it was beneath their dignity to actually do it).
     
  14. Dec 1, 2005 #13
    The possum actually leaves quite a mess in the waterbowl. But I suppose he's using it as a sink to brush his teeth.

    But, yeah. I guess I'd never seen a racoon eat before and I was surprised that he picked stuff up and put it into his mouth with his hands.
     
  15. Dec 1, 2005 #14

    Evo

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    Possums drool quite profusely. If they're happy, they make little drool puddles.
     
  16. Dec 1, 2005 #15
    I think you're mistaking their reaction to you personally as a common trait of the species.
     
  17. Dec 2, 2005 #16

    Moonbear

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    Are you sure you don't have rabid 'possums?
     
  18. Dec 2, 2005 #17
    I found out why cats have such bad attitudes. they can't taste sweet. don't know if they lost the sweet tasting ability because of their meat diet causing it to atrophy from lack of use or if their lack of the ability caused them to go to a meat diet. I just read this in either Discover or Scientific American. Although I did extrapolate the sweetless existence into a bad attitude.
     
  19. Dec 2, 2005 #18
    My girlfriend adores raccoons. I'll show her the pictures, she'll love 'em.

    According to David Attenborough's excellent The Life Of Mammals, raccoons primarily rely on their sense of touch. They have highly sensitive little paws and are able to build mental pictures based on touch in the same way we do with sight. They probably pick up their food with their hands rather than their teeth to check what it is before consuming it.
     
  20. Dec 2, 2005 #19
    That's kind of incredible. They must have a huge portion of the sensory strip of their brains dedicated to their paws.
     
  21. Dec 2, 2005 #20

    DocToxyn

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    I used to put out cat food for our local colony of feral cats (close to 20 individuals at it's height) when we lived in Albany. Like Zooby's, it also brought in opossums and raccoons and once I even saw a fox standing on our porch. The raccoon was apparently a female because one day she showed up with her whole brood. You could hear them coming from a mile away, crashing through the brush and chattering/mewling as loud as they could. It was very entertaining to watch five young raccoons try to eat out of a single bowl, quite a few dissagreements to be had.

    It got really fun when the skunks would show up and want to get in on the food. They would stomp their front feet and flare their tails up and generally get thier way without resorting to chemical warfare. One season some baby skunks also showed up and we watched them playing with the latest batch of kittens for quite some time. Very cute.
     
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