Elastic collision problem Please help

In summary: The figure is a graph that shows the position of the objects after the collision.The figure shows the position of the 0.500-kg object after the collision. The 0.500-kg object travels back up the track and eventually lands at the bottom of the track.
  • #1
5
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Okay I have been working on this problem forever and I don't know what else to try. Can anyone help me?...

A 0.005-kg block is released from rest at the top of a frictionless track 2.50 m above the top of a table. It then collides elastically with a 1.00-kg object that is initially at rest on the table. (a) Determine the velocities of the two objects just after the collision. (b) How high up the track does the 0.500-kg object travel back after the collision? (c) How far away from the bottom of the table does the 1.00-kg object land, given that the table is 2.00 m hight? (d) How far away from the bottom of the table does the 0.500-kg object eventually land?
 
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  • #2
okaymeka said:
Okay I have been working on this problem forever and I don't know what else to try. Can anyone help me?...

A 0.005-kg block is released from rest at the top of a frictionless track 2.50 m above the top of a table. It then collides elastically with a 1.00-kg object that is initially at rest on the table. (a) Determine the velocities of the two objects just after the collision. (b) How high up the track does the 0.500-kg object travel back after the collision? (c) How far away from the bottom of the table does the 1.00-kg object land, given that the table is 2.00 m hight? (d) How far away from the bottom of the table does the 0.500-kg object eventually land?

Hmmm, sounds like a homework problem. You need to think about conservation of momentum and conservation of mechanical energy.
 
  • #3
Concepts involved:

a.Conservation of momentum
b.Impulse
c.Projectile Motion
d.Projectile motion

I would have loves to do the question for you but the guidelines prevent me from doing so.Show some attempt.
 
  • #4
This question is incomplete because set of information provided does not support the question asked. if the motion is linearly verticle then why would the block at table will move horizontally, if the block is released vertically. so to solve this problem you must have a clear figure or the situation must describe more about the kinemetics of the question. else if you have figure either post it or describe it and if figure is avaliable with you then it is very easy then just apply conservation of momentum and mechanical energy.
 
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  • #5
Sorry guys for not showing my original effort. It was late. I tried finding vf with this equation: mgh + 1/2mv^2 = mgh + 1/2mv^2 and it seems like no matter what numbers I plug in I can't come up with the correct answer. I will try ya'll suggestions to see if I can do something differently. Thanks for replying.
 
  • #6
By the way, there is a figure provided with the question. There is a table that is 2.00 m off the ground with a slope on top of the table that is 2.50 m high with m1 at the top of the slope and m2 at the bottom of the slope. And x is on the ground out from the table.
 

1. What is an elastic collision?

An elastic collision is a type of collision between two objects where the total kinetic energy of the system is conserved. This means that the total energy before and after the collision remains the same. In other words, the objects bounce off each other without losing any energy.

2. How is the velocity of objects after an elastic collision calculated?

The velocity of objects after an elastic collision can be calculated using the conservation of momentum and conservation of kinetic energy equations. The initial velocities and masses of the objects are used to solve for the final velocities.

3. What is the difference between an elastic collision and an inelastic collision?

An elastic collision is a collision where the total kinetic energy of the system is conserved, while an inelastic collision is a collision where the total kinetic energy is not conserved. In inelastic collisions, some of the kinetic energy is converted into other forms of energy, such as heat or sound.

4. Can the objects in an elastic collision stick together after the collision?

No, in an elastic collision, the objects cannot stick together after the collision. This is because the total kinetic energy of the system must be conserved, and if the objects stick together, the kinetic energy would decrease, violating the conservation of energy principle.

5. What are some real-life examples of elastic collisions?

Some real-life examples of elastic collisions include billiard balls colliding, two cars bouncing off each other in a car crash, and a rubber ball bouncing off a hard surface. In these examples, the objects involved do not deform or stick together after the collision, and the total kinetic energy is conserved.

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