Electric Field due to a Dipole

In summary, the problem involves two charged particles on an x axis, with charges -q=-3.20(10^{-19})C and q=q=3.20(10^{-19})C, located 3 m from the y axis. The goal is to find the magnitude and direction of the net electric field at point P, located at y=4 m. The Dipole equation can be used to solve this problem. Some initial attempts at using a test charge at point P and adding the fields component wise were incorrect, but the correct solution was eventually found by using the correct distance.
  • #1
Saladsamurai
3,020
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[SOLVED] Electric Field due to a Dipole

Homework Statement


The figure shows two charged particles on an x axis: -q=[itex]-3.20(10^{-19})C[/itex] and q=q=[itex]3.20(10^{-19})C[/itex]. They are both a horizontal distance of 3 m from the y axis. What are the magnitude and direction of the net electric field produced at P at y=4 m?

Picture11.png


Okay. So I know I can use the Dipole equation for this, but I had originally tried placing a test charge at P and adding the fields component wise.

I got the wrong answer and I was just wondering why you cannot take this approach?

This is what I had tried:
[tex]E_{px}=\sum E_x=k[\frac{-|q_1|-|q_2|}{d^2}](\frac{3}{5})=-3.836(10^{-10})[/tex]

And
[tex]E_{py}=\sum E_y=k[\frac{-|q_1|+|q_2|}{d^2}](\frac{4}{5})=0[/tex]
 
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  • #2
Nevermind. This works! I was using the wrong d!
 
  • #3


So the magnitude of the net electric field at P would be 3.836(10^{-10}) and the direction would be towards the negative x-axis. Great job using the dipole equation to solve this problem! Your approach of placing a test charge at P and adding the fields component wise is also a valid method for finding the net electric field. However, in this particular case, it seems that you may have made a mistake in your calculation for the x-component of the electric field. The correct equation for the x-component would be: E_{px}=k[\frac{-|q_1|+|q_2|}{d^2}](\frac{3}{5})=3.836(10^{-10}) N/C. This would result in a net electric field of 4.589(10^{-10}) N/C at an angle of 26.57 degrees below the negative x-axis. Keep up the good work!
 

Related to Electric Field due to a Dipole

What is an electric dipole?

An electric dipole is a pair of equal and opposite charges separated by a small distance. This creates a dipole moment, which is a measure of the strength and direction of the dipole.

How is the electric field calculated for a dipole?

The electric field due to a dipole is calculated by taking the product of the dipole moment and the inverse square of the distance from the dipole. This results in a field that is strongest near the dipole and decreases with distance.

What is the direction of the electric field for a dipole?

The electric field for a dipole is directed from the positive charge towards the negative charge. This means that the field lines point away from the positive charge and towards the negative charge.

How does the electric field change with distance for a dipole?

As the distance from the dipole increases, the strength of the electric field decreases. This is because the inverse square relationship causes the field to spread out over a larger area as distance increases.

Can the electric field of a dipole be zero?

Yes, the electric field of a dipole can be zero at certain points, such as on the line connecting the two charges and at an infinite distance from the dipole. However, the field cannot be zero at all points in the surrounding space.

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